open access

Vol 70, No 3 (2019)
Original Paper
Published online: 2019-03-07
Submitted: 2018-12-24
Accepted: 2019-02-07
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The effects of serum granulin levels on anthropometric measures and glucose metabolism in infertile women with different ovarian reserve status

Ozgur Kan, Umit Gorkem
DOI: 10.5603/EP.a2019.0012
·
Pubmed: 30845343
·
Endokrynologia Polska 2019;70(3):255-259.

open access

Vol 70, No 3 (2019)
Original Paper
Published online: 2019-03-07
Submitted: 2018-12-24
Accepted: 2019-02-07

Abstract

Introduction: Granulin (GRN) is an adipokine with proinflammatory features, which plays important role in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance pathogenesis. It has been reported that granulin precursors were localised in developing follicles in animal studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of granulin levels with anthropometric features, glucose metabolism, and ovarian reserve.

Material and methods: A total of 109 infertile women were included in this cross-sectional, prospective study, who attended a tertiary clinic. All participants were categorised into diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) and normal ovarian reserve groups (NOR), in accordance with Bologna criteria. The demographic characteristics, including age, BMI, waist-hip circumferences, and biochemical parameters, were recorded. Serum granulin level was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

Results: No significant difference was observed in the GRN levels (p = 0.229) between the groups. There was a positive correlation between GRN levels and BMI, WC, HC, and 75 g oral glucose tolerance values in NOR group (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.01, and p < 0.05, respectively).

Conclusions: Our results suggest that granulin is associated with anthropometric features in infertile patients and might be an important indicator of obesity and impaired glucose metabolism. Elevated levels of granulin may have a diabetogenic effect and predispose women to high glucose levels.

Abstract

Introduction: Granulin (GRN) is an adipokine with proinflammatory features, which plays important role in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance pathogenesis. It has been reported that granulin precursors were localised in developing follicles in animal studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of granulin levels with anthropometric features, glucose metabolism, and ovarian reserve.

Material and methods: A total of 109 infertile women were included in this cross-sectional, prospective study, who attended a tertiary clinic. All participants were categorised into diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) and normal ovarian reserve groups (NOR), in accordance with Bologna criteria. The demographic characteristics, including age, BMI, waist-hip circumferences, and biochemical parameters, were recorded. Serum granulin level was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

Results: No significant difference was observed in the GRN levels (p = 0.229) between the groups. There was a positive correlation between GRN levels and BMI, WC, HC, and 75 g oral glucose tolerance values in NOR group (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.01, and p < 0.05, respectively).

Conclusions: Our results suggest that granulin is associated with anthropometric features in infertile patients and might be an important indicator of obesity and impaired glucose metabolism. Elevated levels of granulin may have a diabetogenic effect and predispose women to high glucose levels.

Get Citation

Keywords

granulin; anthropometry; glucose metabolism; ovarian reserve; obesity

About this article
Title

The effects of serum granulin levels on anthropometric measures and glucose metabolism in infertile women with different ovarian reserve status

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 70, No 3 (2019)

Pages

255-259

Published online

2019-03-07

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2019.0012

Pubmed

30845343

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2019;70(3):255-259.

Keywords

granulin
anthropometry
glucose metabolism
ovarian reserve
obesity

Authors

Ozgur Kan
Umit Gorkem

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