open access

Vol 70, No 2 (2019)
REVIEWS — Postgraduate Education
Published online: 2019-04-30
Submitted: 2018-05-14
Accepted: 2018-08-12
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Recomendations on non-pharmacological interventions in women with PCOS to reduce body weight and improve metabolic disorders [Zalecenia dotyczące postępowania niefarmakologicznego u kobiet z PCOS celem zmniejszenia masy ciała i poprawy zaburzeń metabolicznych]

Anna Dutkowska, Aleksandra Konieczna, Justyna Breska-Kruszewska, Magdalena Sendrakowska, Irina Kowalska, Dominik Rachoń
DOI: 10.5603/EP.a2019.0006
·
Pubmed: 31039273
·
Endokrynologia Polska 2019;70(2):198-212.

open access

Vol 70, No 2 (2019)
REVIEWS — Postgraduate Education
Published online: 2019-04-30
Submitted: 2018-05-14
Accepted: 2018-08-12

Abstract

Women with PCOS are characterised by ovarian hyperandrogenism, which, apart from fertility problems, hirsutism, acne, and androgenic alopecia, also leads to the development of central (android) obesity and its adverse metabolic consequences. Additionally, women with PCOS have intrinsic insulin resistance (IR) with its consequent hyperinsulinaemia, which leads to the development of atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which give rise to cardiovascular disease (CVD), being the main cause of death among women. Although there are several publications on the topic of life-style changes in women with PCOS to normalise body weight and thus to reduce the adverse metabolic consequences of obesity, such as T2DM and CVD, the number of randomised studies that would enable the formation of strong recommendations is very limited. Nevertheless, taking into consideration the pathophysiology, any intervention implementing healthy dietary habits leading to the reduction of body weigh should be the core of non-pharmacological treatment in women with PCOS. The aim of the given recommendations herein is to point out and systemise the interventions on lifestyle change in women with PCOS as well as to form a practical guideline for the health care specialists, dieticians, and mental-therapists (psychologist) who take care of women with this syndrome.

Abstract

Women with PCOS are characterised by ovarian hyperandrogenism, which, apart from fertility problems, hirsutism, acne, and androgenic alopecia, also leads to the development of central (android) obesity and its adverse metabolic consequences. Additionally, women with PCOS have intrinsic insulin resistance (IR) with its consequent hyperinsulinaemia, which leads to the development of atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which give rise to cardiovascular disease (CVD), being the main cause of death among women. Although there are several publications on the topic of life-style changes in women with PCOS to normalise body weight and thus to reduce the adverse metabolic consequences of obesity, such as T2DM and CVD, the number of randomised studies that would enable the formation of strong recommendations is very limited. Nevertheless, taking into consideration the pathophysiology, any intervention implementing healthy dietary habits leading to the reduction of body weigh should be the core of non-pharmacological treatment in women with PCOS. The aim of the given recommendations herein is to point out and systemise the interventions on lifestyle change in women with PCOS as well as to form a practical guideline for the health care specialists, dieticians, and mental-therapists (psychologist) who take care of women with this syndrome.
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Keywords

polycystic ovary syndrome; obesity; insulin resistance; lifestyle; diet

About this article
Title

Recomendations on non-pharmacological interventions in women with PCOS to reduce body weight and improve metabolic disorders [Zalecenia dotyczące postępowania niefarmakologicznego u kobiet z PCOS celem zmniejszenia masy ciała i poprawy zaburzeń metabolicznych]

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 70, No 2 (2019)

Pages

198-212

Published online

2019-04-30

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2019.0006

Pubmed

31039273

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2019;70(2):198-212.

Keywords

polycystic ovary syndrome
obesity
insulin resistance
lifestyle
diet

Authors

Anna Dutkowska
Aleksandra Konieczna
Justyna Breska-Kruszewska
Magdalena Sendrakowska
Irina Kowalska
Dominik Rachoń

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