open access

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)
Original Paper
Published online: 2018-06-27
Submitted: 2017-09-01
Accepted: 2018-02-17
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Oxytocin treatment prevents marrow adiposity observed in alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits using proton MR spectroscopy

Haiyang Lin, Minqiao Zheng, Xiaojie Mao, Xuewen feng, Jing Li, Gaofeng Rao, Fang Lin
DOI: 10.5603/EP.a2018.0040
·
Pubmed: 29952410
·
Endokrynologia Polska 2018;69(4):416-422.

open access

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)
Original Paper
Published online: 2018-06-27
Submitted: 2017-09-01
Accepted: 2018-02-17

Abstract

Introduction: Oxytocin might be used therapeutically as an ally to rescue osteopathy resulting from diabetes. However, the in vivo effects of oxytocin on marrow adipogenesis in diabetes remain unknown. In this longitudinal study, we aimed to investigate the protective ef­fects of oxytocin on diabetes-induced marrow adiposity in rabbits using proton MR spectroscopy.

Material and methods: Forty-five female New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into controls, diabetes, and diabetes treated with oxytocin (ip, 0.78 mg/kg) for six months. Marrow fat fraction (FF) was determined by proton MR spectroscopy at baseline, and at three and six months. Bone mineral density was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum biomarkers, glycolipid metabolism, and histological analysis of marrow adipocytes were determined.

Results: Oxytocin treatment had positive metabolic effects in diabetic rabbits, which was based on the changes in glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and lipid profiles. The diabetic rabbits demonstrated dramatic marrow adiposity in a time-dependent manner; at three and six months the FF percentage changes from baseline were 10.1% and 25.8%, respectively (all P < 0.001). Moreover, oxytocin treatment significantly reversed FF values and quantitative parameters of marrow adipocyte in diabetic rabbits to levels of naive control rabbits. Oxytocin improved bone formation marker in diabetic rabbits compared to the saline group. Also, treatment of diabetic rabbits with oxytocin significantly mitigated bone deterioration when compared with the saline-treated diabetic group (all P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Oxytocin appears to alleviate harmful effects of hyperglycaemia on marrow adiposity. Proton MR spectroscopy may be a valuable tool, providing complementary information on efficacy assessments.

Abstract

Introduction: Oxytocin might be used therapeutically as an ally to rescue osteopathy resulting from diabetes. However, the in vivo effects of oxytocin on marrow adipogenesis in diabetes remain unknown. In this longitudinal study, we aimed to investigate the protective ef­fects of oxytocin on diabetes-induced marrow adiposity in rabbits using proton MR spectroscopy.

Material and methods: Forty-five female New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into controls, diabetes, and diabetes treated with oxytocin (ip, 0.78 mg/kg) for six months. Marrow fat fraction (FF) was determined by proton MR spectroscopy at baseline, and at three and six months. Bone mineral density was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum biomarkers, glycolipid metabolism, and histological analysis of marrow adipocytes were determined.

Results: Oxytocin treatment had positive metabolic effects in diabetic rabbits, which was based on the changes in glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and lipid profiles. The diabetic rabbits demonstrated dramatic marrow adiposity in a time-dependent manner; at three and six months the FF percentage changes from baseline were 10.1% and 25.8%, respectively (all P < 0.001). Moreover, oxytocin treatment significantly reversed FF values and quantitative parameters of marrow adipocyte in diabetic rabbits to levels of naive control rabbits. Oxytocin improved bone formation marker in diabetic rabbits compared to the saline group. Also, treatment of diabetic rabbits with oxytocin significantly mitigated bone deterioration when compared with the saline-treated diabetic group (all P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Oxytocin appears to alleviate harmful effects of hyperglycaemia on marrow adiposity. Proton MR spectroscopy may be a valuable tool, providing complementary information on efficacy assessments.

Get Citation

Keywords

diabetes mellitus, oxytocin, marrow adiposity, MR spectroscopy

About this article
Title

Oxytocin treatment prevents marrow adiposity observed in alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits using proton MR spectroscopy

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)

Pages

416-422

Published online

2018-06-27

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2018.0040

Pubmed

29952410

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2018;69(4):416-422.

Keywords

diabetes mellitus
oxytocin
marrow adiposity
MR spectroscopy

Authors

Haiyang Lin
Minqiao Zheng
Xiaojie Mao
Xuewen feng
Jing Li
Gaofeng Rao
Fang Lin

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