open access

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)
Original Paper
Published online: 2018-06-04
Submitted: 2018-01-11
Accepted: 2018-04-22
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Total and high-molecular-weight adiponectin levels and prediction of insulin resistance

Dagmar Horakova, Ladislav Stepanek, Radka Nagelova, Dalibor Pastucha, Katerina Azeem, Helena Kollarova
DOI: 10.5603/EP.a2018.0035
·
Pubmed: 29952412
·
Endokrynologia Polska 2018;69(4):375-380.

open access

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)
Original Paper
Published online: 2018-06-04
Submitted: 2018-01-11
Accepted: 2018-04-22

Abstract

Introduction: Adiponectin is a peptide secreted by adipocytes; its reduction is associated with obesity-related disorders, including insulin resistance (IR). The study analysed levels of total adiponectin and its high-molecular-weight (HMW) oligomer in a group of metabolically healthy adults and in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) to evaluate these levels as potential predictors of the presence of IR.

Materials and methods: The study comprised 269 metabolically healthy adults and 300 patients with T2DM. Anthropometric and bio­chemical indices were measured, including total and HMW adiponectin levels; the Homeostatic Model Assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) index was calculated, and logistic regression analysis was used to predict the presence of IR.

Results: In healthy individuals, both total and HMW adiponectin levels were significantly higher than in diabetic patients. Total and HMW adiponectin levels were moderately correlated with the HOMA-IR index. Logistic regression analysis showed that increased levels of both total adiponectin (odds ratio [OR] 0.598, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.483–0.723) and the HMW form (OR 0.360, 95% CI 0.242–0.511) are protective factors for the development of IR. The cut-off levels were 4.22 mg/L for total adiponectin and 2.75 mg/L for HMW adiponectin. The results are valid for middle-aged European adults.

Conclusions: Adiponectin levels below the indicated cut-offs may predict a potential risk for the development of IR.

Abstract

Introduction: Adiponectin is a peptide secreted by adipocytes; its reduction is associated with obesity-related disorders, including insulin resistance (IR). The study analysed levels of total adiponectin and its high-molecular-weight (HMW) oligomer in a group of metabolically healthy adults and in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) to evaluate these levels as potential predictors of the presence of IR.

Materials and methods: The study comprised 269 metabolically healthy adults and 300 patients with T2DM. Anthropometric and bio­chemical indices were measured, including total and HMW adiponectin levels; the Homeostatic Model Assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) index was calculated, and logistic regression analysis was used to predict the presence of IR.

Results: In healthy individuals, both total and HMW adiponectin levels were significantly higher than in diabetic patients. Total and HMW adiponectin levels were moderately correlated with the HOMA-IR index. Logistic regression analysis showed that increased levels of both total adiponectin (odds ratio [OR] 0.598, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.483–0.723) and the HMW form (OR 0.360, 95% CI 0.242–0.511) are protective factors for the development of IR. The cut-off levels were 4.22 mg/L for total adiponectin and 2.75 mg/L for HMW adiponectin. The results are valid for middle-aged European adults.

Conclusions: Adiponectin levels below the indicated cut-offs may predict a potential risk for the development of IR.

Get Citation

Keywords

total adiponectin, high molecular weight adiponectin, insulin resistance, odds ratio, predictions, cut-off points

About this article
Title

Total and high-molecular-weight adiponectin levels and prediction of insulin resistance

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)

Pages

375-380

Published online

2018-06-04

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2018.0035

Pubmed

29952412

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2018;69(4):375-380.

Keywords

total adiponectin
high molecular weight adiponectin
insulin resistance
odds ratio
predictions
cut-off points

Authors

Dagmar Horakova
Ladislav Stepanek
Radka Nagelova
Dalibor Pastucha
Katerina Azeem
Helena Kollarova

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