open access

Vol 68, No 1 (2017)
Original Paper
Published online: 2017-03-01
Submitted: 2015-12-17
Accepted: 2016-06-04
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The relationship between lipocalin-2 and free testosterone levels in polycystic ovary syndrome

Özgür Yilmaz, Muzaffer Temur, Mehmet Calan, Tuncay Kume, Pelin Özün Özbay, Murat Karakulak, Saadet Yapucu
DOI: 10.5603/EP.2017.0002
·
Pubmed: 28255975
·
Endokrynologia Polska 2017;68(1):7-12.

open access

Vol 68, No 1 (2017)
Original Paper
Published online: 2017-03-01
Submitted: 2015-12-17
Accepted: 2016-06-04

Abstract

Introduction: Lipocalin-2 is an adipokine that is mainly produced from adipocytes and macrophages. Data related to PCOS and other obesity-associated disorders have shown divergent results. Here, we studied lipocalin-2 concentrations in women with PCOS and in healthy women, and investigated the potential contributors underlying lipocalin association with PCOS.

Material and methods: Forty-four women with PCOS and 47 age- and BMI-matched healthy women were enrolled. Fasting serum glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and free testosterone levels were measured. The body fat percentage was measured by bioelectrical impedance.

Results: Lipocalin-2 concentrations were significantly higher in the PCOS group than in the control group (55.74 ± 17.54 ng/mL vs. 36.46 ± 19.62 ng/mL, p = 0.011). There was a correlation between lipocalin-2 levels and free testosterone. In a multiple regression model, the body fat percentage, HOMA-IR, and hs-CRP were not associated with lipocalin-2. However, only free testosterone was associated with lipocalin-2. A “lipocalin-2 = 11.214 + (1.943 × free-testosterone)” equation was obtained.

Conclusions: Serum lipocalin-2 levels were higher in women with PCOS, and only free testosterone was associated with lipocalin-2. Lipocalin-2 levels and their influencing factors have discrepant results in both PCOS and other obesity- or insulin resistance-related metabolic disorders. Thus, the potential role of lipocalin-2 in PCOS should be clarified. (Endokrynol Pol 2017; 68 (1): 7–12)

Abstract

Introduction: Lipocalin-2 is an adipokine that is mainly produced from adipocytes and macrophages. Data related to PCOS and other obesity-associated disorders have shown divergent results. Here, we studied lipocalin-2 concentrations in women with PCOS and in healthy women, and investigated the potential contributors underlying lipocalin association with PCOS.

Material and methods: Forty-four women with PCOS and 47 age- and BMI-matched healthy women were enrolled. Fasting serum glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and free testosterone levels were measured. The body fat percentage was measured by bioelectrical impedance.

Results: Lipocalin-2 concentrations were significantly higher in the PCOS group than in the control group (55.74 ± 17.54 ng/mL vs. 36.46 ± 19.62 ng/mL, p = 0.011). There was a correlation between lipocalin-2 levels and free testosterone. In a multiple regression model, the body fat percentage, HOMA-IR, and hs-CRP were not associated with lipocalin-2. However, only free testosterone was associated with lipocalin-2. A “lipocalin-2 = 11.214 + (1.943 × free-testosterone)” equation was obtained.

Conclusions: Serum lipocalin-2 levels were higher in women with PCOS, and only free testosterone was associated with lipocalin-2. Lipocalin-2 levels and their influencing factors have discrepant results in both PCOS and other obesity- or insulin resistance-related metabolic disorders. Thus, the potential role of lipocalin-2 in PCOS should be clarified. (Endokrynol Pol 2017; 68 (1): 7–12)

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Keywords

1-PCOS; 2- lipocalin-2; 3- free testosterone

About this article
Title

The relationship between lipocalin-2 and free testosterone levels in polycystic ovary syndrome

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 68, No 1 (2017)

Pages

7-12

Published online

2017-03-01

DOI

10.5603/EP.2017.0002

Pubmed

28255975

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2017;68(1):7-12.

Keywords

1-PCOS
2- lipocalin-2
3- free testosterone

Authors

Özgür Yilmaz
Muzaffer Temur
Mehmet Calan
Tuncay Kume
Pelin Özün Özbay
Murat Karakulak
Saadet Yapucu

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