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Review paper
Submitted: 2024-02-04
Accepted: 2024-03-14
Published online: 2024-05-06
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Dilemmas concerning the course of pregnancy in patients with anorexia nervosa considering hormonal and somatic parameters

Elżbieta Sowińska-Przepiera12, Mariola Krzyścin2, Igor Syrenicz1, Zana Bumbuliene3, Alicja Wajs-Syrenicz4, Adam Przepiera5, Anna Brzeska, Anhelli Syrenicz1
·
Pubmed: 38708911
Affiliations
  1. Department of Endocrinology, Metabolic and Internal Diseases, Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, Szczecin, Poland
  2. Pediatric Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic Department of Gynaecology Endocrinology, and Gynaecological Oncology, Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, Szczecin, Poland
  3. Centre for Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vilnius University Hospital, Santaros Klinikos, Vilnius University, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius, Lithuania
  4. Department of Skin and Venereal Diseases, Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, Szczecin, Poland
  5. Department of Urology and Urological Oncology, Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, Szczecin, Poland

open access

Online first
Review Article
Submitted: 2024-02-04
Accepted: 2024-03-14
Published online: 2024-05-06

Abstract

Mental anorexia nervosa is a rare, potentially severe, chronic, and recurrent mental disorder that occurs more often in women than in men, especially during the childbearing years. The disorder is associated with an increased risk of mortality, mainly related to the physical consequences of severe malnutrition and suicide. Malnutrition of the body can cause serious hormonal and somatic problems. Despite significant hormonal disturbances that reduce fertility, a woman with anorexia can become pregnant. A new phenomenon now seen with increasing frequency is pregorexia, an eating disorder associated with pregnancy. It involves the use of dietary restrictions to avoid excessive weight gain during pregnancy.

Pregnancy changes the hormonal economy mainly due to the development of the placenta, which secretes many hormones, not just sex hormones. Mental anorexia poses a significant risk to both mother and child if not diagnosed and treated properly. Treatment of anorexia involves simultaneous somatic and psychological treatment. During pregnancy, additional care should be taken to create an optimal environment for the developing foetus. Unfortunately, there is still a lack of research providing guidance in this area. Available studies are mainly case reports or reports focusing on specific clinical situations. It is worth noting that no study to date has attempted a comprehensive assessment of endocrine disruption in pregnant women with anorexia. Recognising the existing knowledge gap on endocrine disorders in pregnant women with anorexia nervosa, a systematic review of the literature was conducted.

Abstract

Mental anorexia nervosa is a rare, potentially severe, chronic, and recurrent mental disorder that occurs more often in women than in men, especially during the childbearing years. The disorder is associated with an increased risk of mortality, mainly related to the physical consequences of severe malnutrition and suicide. Malnutrition of the body can cause serious hormonal and somatic problems. Despite significant hormonal disturbances that reduce fertility, a woman with anorexia can become pregnant. A new phenomenon now seen with increasing frequency is pregorexia, an eating disorder associated with pregnancy. It involves the use of dietary restrictions to avoid excessive weight gain during pregnancy.

Pregnancy changes the hormonal economy mainly due to the development of the placenta, which secretes many hormones, not just sex hormones. Mental anorexia poses a significant risk to both mother and child if not diagnosed and treated properly. Treatment of anorexia involves simultaneous somatic and psychological treatment. During pregnancy, additional care should be taken to create an optimal environment for the developing foetus. Unfortunately, there is still a lack of research providing guidance in this area. Available studies are mainly case reports or reports focusing on specific clinical situations. It is worth noting that no study to date has attempted a comprehensive assessment of endocrine disruption in pregnant women with anorexia. Recognising the existing knowledge gap on endocrine disorders in pregnant women with anorexia nervosa, a systematic review of the literature was conducted.

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Keywords

peripartum disorders; women’s mental health; anorexia nervosa; pregorexia nervosa; eating disorders; pregnancy; amenorrhea; oestrogens; bone loss; mental disease; forced treatment

About this article
Title

Dilemmas concerning the course of pregnancy in patients with anorexia nervosa considering hormonal and somatic parameters

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Online first

Article type

Review paper

Published online

2024-05-06

Page views

203

Article views/downloads

135

DOI

10.5603/ep.99255

Pubmed

38708911

Keywords

peripartum disorders
women’s mental health
anorexia nervosa
pregorexia nervosa
eating disorders
pregnancy
amenorrhea
oestrogens
bone loss
mental disease
forced treatment

Authors

Elżbieta Sowińska-Przepiera
Mariola Krzyścin
Igor Syrenicz
Zana Bumbuliene
Alicja Wajs-Syrenicz
Adam Przepiera
Anna Brzeska
Anhelli Syrenicz

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