open access

Vol 75, No 1 (2024)
Original paper
Submitted: 2023-09-01
Accepted: 2023-11-21
Published online: 2024-02-21
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Height loss in postmenopausal women predicts multiple fractures in 10-year follow-up: results from the RAC-OST-POL study

Wojciech Pluskiewicz1, Piotr Adamczyk2, Aleksandra Werner3, Malgorzata Bach3, Bogna Drozdzowska4
·
Pubmed: 38497395
·
Endokrynol Pol 2024;75(1):95-101.
Affiliations
  1. Department and Clinic of Internal Diseases, Diabetology, and Nephrology, Metabolic Bone Diseases Unit, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland
  2. Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland
  3. Department of Applied Informatics, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
  4. Department of Pathomorphology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland

open access

Vol 75, No 1 (2024)
Original Paper
Submitted: 2023-09-01
Accepted: 2023-11-21
Published online: 2024-02-21

Abstract

Introduction: In daily practice the diagnostic process for osteoporosis in elderly patients should also include physical assessment. The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis that height loss (HL) predicts fracture incidence.

Material and methods: The study was performed in an epidemiological sample of postmenopausal women recruited in the RAC-OST-POL study. At baseline, data were collected in 978 postmenopausal women at a mean age of 66.48±7.6 years, and at 10-year follow-up 640 patients remained, with a mean age of 75.04 ± 6.95 years. Current height and HL were established in regard to maximal life height. Data on fracture incidence were gathered throughout the period of observation.

Results: During the follow-up period 190 osteoporotic fractures were noted. Ninety-one women had one fracture, and in 38 women, multiple fractures occurred. In the fractured and unfractured subgroups, HL was 5.45 ± 3.28 and 4.8 ± 3.56 cm, respectively, and differed significantly (p < 0.05). HL in subjects without fracture did not differ from those with one fracture (HL 4.8 ± 3.56 vs. 4.8 ± 2.66 cm,
respectively). For patients with more than one fracture HL was 7.03 ± 4.06 cm and was significantly higher than in subjects with one or without any fracture (p < 0.01). Based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, HL of 6 cm was identified as the cut-off point
for high risk of multiple fractures.

Conclusion: HL of at least 6 cm is the predictor of multiple fractures in a prospective observation of a representative epidemiological female sample. Therefore, the measurement of HL should always be included in patients’ assessments.

Abstract

Introduction: In daily practice the diagnostic process for osteoporosis in elderly patients should also include physical assessment. The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis that height loss (HL) predicts fracture incidence.

Material and methods: The study was performed in an epidemiological sample of postmenopausal women recruited in the RAC-OST-POL study. At baseline, data were collected in 978 postmenopausal women at a mean age of 66.48±7.6 years, and at 10-year follow-up 640 patients remained, with a mean age of 75.04 ± 6.95 years. Current height and HL were established in regard to maximal life height. Data on fracture incidence were gathered throughout the period of observation.

Results: During the follow-up period 190 osteoporotic fractures were noted. Ninety-one women had one fracture, and in 38 women, multiple fractures occurred. In the fractured and unfractured subgroups, HL was 5.45 ± 3.28 and 4.8 ± 3.56 cm, respectively, and differed significantly (p < 0.05). HL in subjects without fracture did not differ from those with one fracture (HL 4.8 ± 3.56 vs. 4.8 ± 2.66 cm,
respectively). For patients with more than one fracture HL was 7.03 ± 4.06 cm and was significantly higher than in subjects with one or without any fracture (p < 0.01). Based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, HL of 6 cm was identified as the cut-off point
for high risk of multiple fractures.

Conclusion: HL of at least 6 cm is the predictor of multiple fractures in a prospective observation of a representative epidemiological female sample. Therefore, the measurement of HL should always be included in patients’ assessments.

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Keywords

epidemiological sample; fracture prediction; height loss; women

About this article
Title

Height loss in postmenopausal women predicts multiple fractures in 10-year follow-up: results from the RAC-OST-POL study

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 75, No 1 (2024)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

95-101

Published online

2024-02-21

Page views

314

Article views/downloads

214

DOI

10.5603/ep.97226

Pubmed

38497395

Bibliographic record

Endokrynol Pol 2024;75(1):95-101.

Keywords

epidemiological sample
fracture prediction
height loss
women

Authors

Wojciech Pluskiewicz
Piotr Adamczyk
Aleksandra Werner
Malgorzata Bach
Bogna Drozdzowska

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