open access

Vol 74, No 4 (2023)
Original paper
Submitted: 2023-04-14
Accepted: 2023-05-27
Published online: 2023-07-18
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Evaluation of pulmonary side effects in prolactinoma patients treated with cabergoline

Ozlem Soyluk1, Zuleyha Bingol2, Sema Ciftci3, Neslihan Kurtulmus3, Seher Tanrikulu4, Sema Yarman1
·
Pubmed: 37577991
·
Endokrynol Pol 2023;74(4):380-384.
Affiliations
  1. Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Türkiye
  2. Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Türkiye
  3. Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Bakırkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Research and Training Hospital, Istanbul, Türkiye
  4. Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Maslak Hospital, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Türkiye

open access

Vol 74, No 4 (2023)
Original Paper
Submitted: 2023-04-14
Accepted: 2023-05-27
Published online: 2023-07-18

Abstract

Introduction: Cabergoline (CAB) is the most used dopamine agonist in the treatment of prolactinomas. Studies related to the treatment of Parkinson’s disease have shown that dopamine agonists can lead to fibrotic syndromes affecting the heart and the lung.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible pulmonary side effects of CAB in prolactinoma patients.

Material and methods: Chest X-ray imaging and pulmonary function parameters like forced vital capacity (FVC), total lung capacity (TLC), and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were evaluated in 73 prolactinoma patients. The cumulative dose of CAB and the total duration of CAB use were also calculated, and all data were reviewed retrospectively.

Results: The median cumulative CAB dose was 192 mg, and the median duration of CAB use was 64 months. Only 13 patients (17%) among this cohort had abnormal DLCO results that could be an indirect sign of pulmonary fibrosis. These abnormal DLCO results were found not to be associated with cumulative CAB dose in these 13 patients.

Conclusions: CAB appears to be safe in terms of pulmonary functions with a median cumulative dose of 192 mg in prolactinoma patients.

Abstract

Introduction: Cabergoline (CAB) is the most used dopamine agonist in the treatment of prolactinomas. Studies related to the treatment of Parkinson’s disease have shown that dopamine agonists can lead to fibrotic syndromes affecting the heart and the lung.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible pulmonary side effects of CAB in prolactinoma patients.

Material and methods: Chest X-ray imaging and pulmonary function parameters like forced vital capacity (FVC), total lung capacity (TLC), and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were evaluated in 73 prolactinoma patients. The cumulative dose of CAB and the total duration of CAB use were also calculated, and all data were reviewed retrospectively.

Results: The median cumulative CAB dose was 192 mg, and the median duration of CAB use was 64 months. Only 13 patients (17%) among this cohort had abnormal DLCO results that could be an indirect sign of pulmonary fibrosis. These abnormal DLCO results were found not to be associated with cumulative CAB dose in these 13 patients.

Conclusions: CAB appears to be safe in terms of pulmonary functions with a median cumulative dose of 192 mg in prolactinoma patients.

Get Citation

Keywords

pleural fibrosis; pulmonary fibrosis; dopamine agonist; prolactinoma; cabergoline

About this article
Title

Evaluation of pulmonary side effects in prolactinoma patients treated with cabergoline

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 74, No 4 (2023)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

380-384

Published online

2023-07-18

Page views

1100

Article views/downloads

337

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2023.0045

Pubmed

37577991

Bibliographic record

Endokrynol Pol 2023;74(4):380-384.

Keywords

pleural fibrosis
pulmonary fibrosis
dopamine agonist
prolactinoma
cabergoline

Authors

Ozlem Soyluk
Zuleyha Bingol
Sema Ciftci
Neslihan Kurtulmus
Seher Tanrikulu
Sema Yarman

References (22)
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