open access

Vol 72, No 5 (2021)
Original paper
Submitted: 2021-07-13
Accepted: 2021-07-17
Published online: 2021-08-11
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Quality of life in patients with acromegaly receiving lanreotide autogel: a real-world observational study

Marek Bolanowski1, Alicja Hubalewska-Dydejczyk2, Beata Kos-Kudła3, Marek Ruchała4, Przemysław Witek5, Wojciech Zgliczyński6, Aude Houchard7, Marta Bartmańska8
DOI: 10.5603/EP.a2021.0075
·
Pubmed: 34647602
·
Endokrynologia Polska 2021;72(5):512-519.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Isotope Therapy, Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland
  2. Department of Endocrinology, Jagiellonian University, Medical College, Krakow, Poland
  3. Department of Endocrinology and Neuroendocrine Tumours, ENETS Centre of Excellence, Department of Pathophysiology and Endocrinology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
  4. Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Internal Diseases, University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  5. Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, and Diabetes, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
  6. Department of Endocrinology, Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Warsaw, Poland
  7. Ipsen, Boulogne-Billancourt Cedex, France
  8. Ipsen, Warsaw, Poland

open access

Vol 72, No 5 (2021)
Original Paper
Submitted: 2021-07-13
Accepted: 2021-07-17
Published online: 2021-08-11

Abstract

Introduction: Patients with acromegaly have substantially reduced quality of life (QoL). This study evaluated QoL in patients with acromegaly treated with lanreotide autogel.

Material and methods: This was a prospective, non-interventional, observational, multi-centre study conducted in Poland (NCT02396966). We included patients with acromegaly, who received treatment with lanreotide autogel 120 mg for ≥ 3 months and < 3 years. Patients were assessed approximately every 4–5 months for two years (six visits). QoL was measured with the Acromegaly Quality of Life Questionnaire (AcroQoL).

Results: Of 152 patients enrolled from November 2014 to May 2018 in 37 centres, 24 were excluded due to major protocol deviations. The results are reported for the study population (n = 128). At baseline, the median [95% confidence interval (CI)] time from diagnosis was 3.3 (2.8, 4.2) years, and the median time since lanreotide initiation was 13.4 (9.9, 17.3) months. Symptoms of acromegaly were present at baseline in 86% of patients (headache, 57%; sweating, 58%; joint symptoms, 64%); symptoms remained unchanged at two years in 82% of patients. At baseline, 27% of patients had hormonal control (growth hormone < 2.5 μg/L and insulin-like growth factor-1 within the normal range); hormonal control status did not change during the study period in over 81% of patients. At baseline, 88% of patients were either very satisfied or satisfied with treatment; treatment satisfaction was unchanged in 62% of patients over the study period. Mean (95% CI) AcroQoL scores at baseline were as follows: total, 50.3 (47.3, 53.3); physical dimension, 48.8 (45.2, 52.4); psychological dimension, 51.3 (48.2, 54.4); appearance subdimension, 40.7 (37.5, 43.8); and personal relations subdimension, 62.5 (58.8, 66.2). The psychological appearance subscore improved by 3.8 points (1.2, 6.5) over the two years; scores in the remaining dimensions and subdimensions did not change substantially. The total AcroQoL score remained unchanged over the two years, regardless of prior acromegaly treatment, surgery or radiotherapy, hormonal control, or lanreotide dosing interval. No new safety findings were identified.

Conclusions: AcroQoL total scores and physical and psychological subscores remained stable but impaired among patients with long-lasting acromegaly treated with lanreotide autogel for two years. The psychological appearance subdimension improved numerically.

Abstract

Introduction: Patients with acromegaly have substantially reduced quality of life (QoL). This study evaluated QoL in patients with acromegaly treated with lanreotide autogel.

Material and methods: This was a prospective, non-interventional, observational, multi-centre study conducted in Poland (NCT02396966). We included patients with acromegaly, who received treatment with lanreotide autogel 120 mg for ≥ 3 months and < 3 years. Patients were assessed approximately every 4–5 months for two years (six visits). QoL was measured with the Acromegaly Quality of Life Questionnaire (AcroQoL).

Results: Of 152 patients enrolled from November 2014 to May 2018 in 37 centres, 24 were excluded due to major protocol deviations. The results are reported for the study population (n = 128). At baseline, the median [95% confidence interval (CI)] time from diagnosis was 3.3 (2.8, 4.2) years, and the median time since lanreotide initiation was 13.4 (9.9, 17.3) months. Symptoms of acromegaly were present at baseline in 86% of patients (headache, 57%; sweating, 58%; joint symptoms, 64%); symptoms remained unchanged at two years in 82% of patients. At baseline, 27% of patients had hormonal control (growth hormone < 2.5 μg/L and insulin-like growth factor-1 within the normal range); hormonal control status did not change during the study period in over 81% of patients. At baseline, 88% of patients were either very satisfied or satisfied with treatment; treatment satisfaction was unchanged in 62% of patients over the study period. Mean (95% CI) AcroQoL scores at baseline were as follows: total, 50.3 (47.3, 53.3); physical dimension, 48.8 (45.2, 52.4); psychological dimension, 51.3 (48.2, 54.4); appearance subdimension, 40.7 (37.5, 43.8); and personal relations subdimension, 62.5 (58.8, 66.2). The psychological appearance subscore improved by 3.8 points (1.2, 6.5) over the two years; scores in the remaining dimensions and subdimensions did not change substantially. The total AcroQoL score remained unchanged over the two years, regardless of prior acromegaly treatment, surgery or radiotherapy, hormonal control, or lanreotide dosing interval. No new safety findings were identified.

Conclusions: AcroQoL total scores and physical and psychological subscores remained stable but impaired among patients with long-lasting acromegaly treated with lanreotide autogel for two years. The psychological appearance subdimension improved numerically.

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Keywords

acromegaly; somatostatin analogue; lanreotide; quality of life; AcroQoL

About this article
Title

Quality of life in patients with acromegaly receiving lanreotide autogel: a real-world observational study

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 72, No 5 (2021)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

512-519

Published online

2021-08-11

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2021.0075

Pubmed

34647602

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2021;72(5):512-519.

Keywords

acromegaly
somatostatin analogue
lanreotide
quality of life
AcroQoL

Authors

Marek Bolanowski
Alicja Hubalewska-Dydejczyk
Beata Kos-Kudła
Marek Ruchała
Przemysław Witek
Wojciech Zgliczyński
Aude Houchard
Marta Bartmańska

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