open access

Vol 72, No 5 (2021)
Brief communication
Submitted: 2021-05-24
Accepted: 2021-06-27
Published online: 2021-07-12
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Retrospective analysis of 23 Chinese children with congenital hyperinsulinism undergoing pancreatectomy

Lin Zhang1, Zi-Di Xu1, Min Liu1, Qiao Zeng1, Rong-Min Li2, Jie-Ying Wang2, Huan-Min Wang3, Long Li4, Hong Qin3, Jie Yan1, Yu-Jun Wu1, Cheng Zhu1, Gui-Chen Ni1, Yan-Mei Sang1
DOI: 10.5603/EP.a2021.0066
·
Pubmed: 34292572
·
Endokrynol Pol 2021;72(5):584-585.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Endocrinology, Genetics and Metabolism Centre, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Centre for Children’s Health, Beijing, China
  2. Baoding Key Laboratory of Clinical Research on Children’s Respiratory and Digestive Diseases/Baoding Children’s Hospital, Baoding, Hebei, China
  3. Department of Surgical Oncology, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Centre for Children’s Health, Beijing, China
  4. Department of Paediatric Surgery, Children’s Hospital, Capital Institute of Paediatrics, Beijing, China

open access

Vol 72, No 5 (2021)
Short communication
Submitted: 2021-05-24
Accepted: 2021-06-27
Published online: 2021-07-12

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of the study was to discuss therapeutic effect and prognosis of pancreatectomy in the treatment of congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI).

Material and methods: A total of 23 Chinese children with CHI, who had undergone pancreatectomy, were selected as the study objects. The clinical data, the results of the 18Fluoro-L-3-4 dihydroxyphenylalanine positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (18F-DOPA PET/CT) scanning, and the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up were analysed retrospectively.

Results: Among the 23 cases, 14 patients were diagnosed with focal-type CHI via a 18F-DOPA PET/CT scan prior to the operation, with the lesions removed via partial pancreatectomy. After the operation, ten patients (71%) had normal blood glucose levels, while frequent feeding was required in four patients (29%) to control the hypoglycaemia. Three cases were diagnosed as diffuse-type CHI via preoperative scanning, two of which were treated by subtotal pancreatectomy. The other case was treated by near-total pancreatectomy, and the blood glucose level was normal following the operation. The remaining six cases were not diagnosed via the pancreatic scanning prior to the operation due to the limitation of certain conditions. Here, pancreatectomy was performed directly due to severe hypoglycaemia.

Conclusions: 18F-DOPA PET/CT scanning was a reliable method for determining the histological type and localizing the lesion before the operation. Partial pancreatectomy for focal-type CHI had a high cure rate. 

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of the study was to discuss therapeutic effect and prognosis of pancreatectomy in the treatment of congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI).

Material and methods: A total of 23 Chinese children with CHI, who had undergone pancreatectomy, were selected as the study objects. The clinical data, the results of the 18Fluoro-L-3-4 dihydroxyphenylalanine positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (18F-DOPA PET/CT) scanning, and the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up were analysed retrospectively.

Results: Among the 23 cases, 14 patients were diagnosed with focal-type CHI via a 18F-DOPA PET/CT scan prior to the operation, with the lesions removed via partial pancreatectomy. After the operation, ten patients (71%) had normal blood glucose levels, while frequent feeding was required in four patients (29%) to control the hypoglycaemia. Three cases were diagnosed as diffuse-type CHI via preoperative scanning, two of which were treated by subtotal pancreatectomy. The other case was treated by near-total pancreatectomy, and the blood glucose level was normal following the operation. The remaining six cases were not diagnosed via the pancreatic scanning prior to the operation due to the limitation of certain conditions. Here, pancreatectomy was performed directly due to severe hypoglycaemia.

Conclusions: 18F-DOPA PET/CT scanning was a reliable method for determining the histological type and localizing the lesion before the operation. Partial pancreatectomy for focal-type CHI had a high cure rate. 

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Keywords

congenital hyperinsulinism; hypoglycaemia; pancreatectomy; 18F-DOPA PET/CT scan

About this article
Title

Retrospective analysis of 23 Chinese children with congenital hyperinsulinism undergoing pancreatectomy

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 72, No 5 (2021)

Article type

Brief communication

Pages

584-585

Published online

2021-07-12

Page views

2809

Article views/downloads

239

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2021.0066

Pubmed

34292572

Bibliographic record

Endokrynol Pol 2021;72(5):584-585.

Keywords

congenital hyperinsulinism
hypoglycaemia
pancreatectomy
18F-DOPA PET/CT scan

Authors

Lin Zhang
Zi-Di Xu
Min Liu
Qiao Zeng
Rong-Min Li
Jie-Ying Wang
Huan-Min Wang
Long Li
Hong Qin
Jie Yan
Yu-Jun Wu
Cheng Zhu
Gui-Chen Ni
Yan-Mei Sang

References (4)
  1. Yorifuji T, Horikawa R, Hasegawa T, et al. (on behalf of The Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and The Japanese Society of Pediatric Surgeons). Clinical practice guidelines for congenital hyperinsulinism. Clin Pediatr Endocrinol. 2017; 26(3): 127–152.
  2. Ferrara C, Patel P, Becker S, et al. Biomarkers of Insulin for the Diagnosis of Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia in Infants and Children. J Pediatr. 2016; 168: 212–219.
  3. Lord K, De León DD. Monogenic hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia: current insights into the pathogenesis and management. Int J Pediatr Endocrinol. 2013; 2013(1): 3.
  4. Galcheva S, Al-Khawaga S, Hussain K. Diagnosis and management of hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia. Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2018; 32(4): 551–573.

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