open access

Vol 64, No 1 (2013)
Original papers
Published online: 2013-02-28
Submitted: 2013-05-14
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Assessment of bone metabolism in premenopausal females with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism

Dominika Tuchendler, Marek Bolanowski
Endokrynologia Polska 2013;64(1):40-44.

open access

Vol 64, No 1 (2013)
Original papers
Published online: 2013-02-28
Submitted: 2013-05-14

Abstract

Introduction: Osteoporosis is one of the commonest metabolic diseases of bone. Its possible causes may include thyroid hormonal dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism on osseous tissue metabolism in premenopausal women.
Material and methods:
38 women with hyperthyroidism, 40 with hypothyroidism and 41 healthy women participated in this study. Initially after 6 and 12 months, each patient underwent selected hormonal, immunological and biochemical tests, measurement of concentrations of bone turnover markers and densitometry were also performed.
Results: On initial evaluation, lower cortical bone density was found in patients with hyperthyroidism (femoral neck). After 12 months, an increase in BMD was seen, but it was still lower than in the control group. Statistically significantly higher concentrations of bone turnover markers, decreasing from the sixth month of treatment, were noted only in the group with hyperthyroidism. Statistically significant differences were not noted in the femoral neck nor in the lumbar spine BMD in patients with hypothyroidism.
Conclusions: Hyperthyroidism poses a negative effect on bone metabolism. Hypothyroidism in premenopausal females does not have any influence on bone density.

Abstract

Introduction: Osteoporosis is one of the commonest metabolic diseases of bone. Its possible causes may include thyroid hormonal dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism on osseous tissue metabolism in premenopausal women.
Material and methods:
38 women with hyperthyroidism, 40 with hypothyroidism and 41 healthy women participated in this study. Initially after 6 and 12 months, each patient underwent selected hormonal, immunological and biochemical tests, measurement of concentrations of bone turnover markers and densitometry were also performed.
Results: On initial evaluation, lower cortical bone density was found in patients with hyperthyroidism (femoral neck). After 12 months, an increase in BMD was seen, but it was still lower than in the control group. Statistically significantly higher concentrations of bone turnover markers, decreasing from the sixth month of treatment, were noted only in the group with hyperthyroidism. Statistically significant differences were not noted in the femoral neck nor in the lumbar spine BMD in patients with hypothyroidism.
Conclusions: Hyperthyroidism poses a negative effect on bone metabolism. Hypothyroidism in premenopausal females does not have any influence on bone density.
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Keywords

hyperthyroidism; hypothyroidism; bone mineral density (BMD); osteocalcin (OC); collagen type 1 crosslinked C-telopeptides (CTx)

About this article
Title

Assessment of bone metabolism in premenopausal females with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 64, No 1 (2013)

Pages

40-44

Published online

2013-02-28

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2013;64(1):40-44.

Keywords

hyperthyroidism
hypothyroidism
bone mineral density (BMD)
osteocalcin (OC)
collagen type 1 crosslinked C-telopeptides (CTx)

Authors

Dominika Tuchendler
Marek Bolanowski

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