Vol 64, No 1 (2013)
Original paper
Published online: 2013-02-28

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Factors associated with glucose metabolism disorders after kidney transplantation

Barbara Brzezińska, Roman Junik, Anna Kamińska, Zbigniew Włodarczyk, Andrzej Adamowicz
Endokrynol Pol 2013;64(1):21-25.

Abstract

Introduction: Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM), pre-diabetes-impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) are frequent complications after organ transplantation. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of PTDM, IFG and IGT in a group of renal transplant recipients, to compare the frequency of glucose metabolism disorders in subjects treated with tacrolimus and with cyclosporine, and to establish the influence of different risk factors on the development of glucose metabolism disorders.
Material and methods:
We examined 206 non-diabetic kidney allograft recipients (age 46.4 ± 12.3 years, time since transplantation 45.5 ± ± 33.6 months, BMI 26.3 ± 4.5 kg/m2). Glucose metabolism disorders were diagnosed using an oral glucose tolerance test. Logistic regression was used to assess the influence of each risk factor (age, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, the presence of cardiovascular disease, positive family history of diabetes, cholesterol and triglycerides concentration) on the development of glucose metabolism disorders.
Results: In 103 patients (50%), we diagnosed glucose metabolism disorders. 19% of patients had PTDM, 14% IFG, and 17% IGT. We did not find any differences in the frequency of glucose metabolism disorders between patients treated with tacrolimus and with cyclosporine. Multivariate analysis identified BMI and a family history of diabetes as independent risk factors of glucose metabolism disorders.
Conclusions: We found a high prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders in the examined group. This suggests that kidney transplant recipients should be screened for these disturbances. Patients with higher BMI and with first-degree relatives with diabetes had an increased risk of glucose metabolism disorders after kidney transplantation.