open access

Vol 57, No 1 (2006)
Review article
Published online: 2006-03-20
Submitted: 2013-02-15
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The radiological situation before and after Chernobyl disaster

Marcin Leoniak, Anna Zonenberg, Wiesław Zarzycki
Endokrynologia Polska 2006;57(1):45-52.

open access

Vol 57, No 1 (2006)
Review article
Published online: 2006-03-20
Submitted: 2013-02-15

Abstract

The nuclear reactor accident, which occurred on 26 April 1986 at Chernobyl, has been one of the greatest ecological disasters in human history. In our study we discussed the most recent data on the accident, and the natural and synthetic sources of radiation. According to the recent data, the air at Chernobyl had been contaminated with about 5300 PBq radionuclide activity (excluding rare gases), including 1760 PBq 131I and 85 PBq 137Cs. The highest radiation received by the liquidators (0.8-16 Gy), lower doses were received by the population which was evacuated or inhabited the contaminated areas (in which the level of 137Cs activity deposited in the earth was 37 kBq/m2). In the European countries the highest mean radiation dose per year for the whole body in the first year after the accident was in Bulgaria (760 µSv), Austria (670 µSv) and Greece (590 µSv), while the lowest radiation dose was observed in Portugal (1.8 µSv) and Spain (4.2 µSv). In Poland the mean effective equivalent dose resulting from Chernobyl accident was 932 µSv and is close to the limited dose permitted in Poland, equalling 1 mSv/year. The highest radiation dose to thyroid was received by inhabitants of the states previously known as Bielskopodlaskie, Nowosadeckie and the north-east region of Poland. Lowest dose was received by inhabitants of the areas previously known as Slupski and Rzeszowski.

Abstract

The nuclear reactor accident, which occurred on 26 April 1986 at Chernobyl, has been one of the greatest ecological disasters in human history. In our study we discussed the most recent data on the accident, and the natural and synthetic sources of radiation. According to the recent data, the air at Chernobyl had been contaminated with about 5300 PBq radionuclide activity (excluding rare gases), including 1760 PBq 131I and 85 PBq 137Cs. The highest radiation received by the liquidators (0.8-16 Gy), lower doses were received by the population which was evacuated or inhabited the contaminated areas (in which the level of 137Cs activity deposited in the earth was 37 kBq/m2). In the European countries the highest mean radiation dose per year for the whole body in the first year after the accident was in Bulgaria (760 µSv), Austria (670 µSv) and Greece (590 µSv), while the lowest radiation dose was observed in Portugal (1.8 µSv) and Spain (4.2 µSv). In Poland the mean effective equivalent dose resulting from Chernobyl accident was 932 µSv and is close to the limited dose permitted in Poland, equalling 1 mSv/year. The highest radiation dose to thyroid was received by inhabitants of the states previously known as Bielskopodlaskie, Nowosadeckie and the north-east region of Poland. Lowest dose was received by inhabitants of the areas previously known as Slupski and Rzeszowski.
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Keywords

Chernobyl disaster; radioactive contamination

About this article
Title

The radiological situation before and after Chernobyl disaster

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 57, No 1 (2006)

Pages

45-52

Published online

2006-03-20

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2006;57(1):45-52.

Keywords

Chernobyl disaster
radioactive contamination

Authors

Marcin Leoniak
Anna Zonenberg
Wiesław Zarzycki

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