open access

Vol 57, No 2 (2006)
Original papers
Published online: 2006-05-26
Submitted: 2013-02-15
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Pattern visual evoked potentials in the early diagnosis of optic neuropathy in the course of Graves’ ophthalmopathy

Przemysław Pawłowski, Janusz Myśliwiec, Małgorzata Mrugacz, Alina Bakunowicz-Łazarczyk, Maria Górska
Endokrynologia Polska 2006;57(2):122-126.

open access

Vol 57, No 2 (2006)
Original papers
Published online: 2006-05-26
Submitted: 2013-02-15

Abstract

The aim of the study: to investigate by means of pattern visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) early neuropathic changes in Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO) patients without any clinical symptoms of optic neuropathy in order to evaluate the prevalence of subclinical optic neuropathy in GO patients and to elucidate whether there is a relationship between PVEP (P100 and N75 latency), intraocular pressure (IOP) and exophthalmometry.
Material and methods. Two groups of patients were examined: 15 patients with GO without clinical signs of dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) and 12 healthy controls. The correlations between the N75 and P100 latencies, IOP and Hertel exophthalmometry were investigated.
Results. The mean PVEP N75 and P100 latencies were significantly delayed in the GO uncomplicated with DON in comparison with controls (LP100- 106.2 ± 4.4 ms vs. 102.4 ± 2.7 ms, p < 0.01 and LN75- 79.0 ± 3.7 ms vs. 73.9 ± 2.8 ms, p < 0.001). In GO patients we documented a positive correlation between the LN75 latency and exophthalmometric readings (R = 0.51; p < 0.01). The value of LP100 and LN75 was above the normal limit in 5/30 eyes (17%) and in 3/30 eyes (10%) respectively.
Conclusions: The assessment of PVEPs (especially the P100 latency) in GO patients without clinical signs of DON is a useful tool for the early diagnosis of optic nerve involvement.

Abstract

The aim of the study: to investigate by means of pattern visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) early neuropathic changes in Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO) patients without any clinical symptoms of optic neuropathy in order to evaluate the prevalence of subclinical optic neuropathy in GO patients and to elucidate whether there is a relationship between PVEP (P100 and N75 latency), intraocular pressure (IOP) and exophthalmometry.
Material and methods. Two groups of patients were examined: 15 patients with GO without clinical signs of dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) and 12 healthy controls. The correlations between the N75 and P100 latencies, IOP and Hertel exophthalmometry were investigated.
Results. The mean PVEP N75 and P100 latencies were significantly delayed in the GO uncomplicated with DON in comparison with controls (LP100- 106.2 ± 4.4 ms vs. 102.4 ± 2.7 ms, p < 0.01 and LN75- 79.0 ± 3.7 ms vs. 73.9 ± 2.8 ms, p < 0.001). In GO patients we documented a positive correlation between the LN75 latency and exophthalmometric readings (R = 0.51; p < 0.01). The value of LP100 and LN75 was above the normal limit in 5/30 eyes (17%) and in 3/30 eyes (10%) respectively.
Conclusions: The assessment of PVEPs (especially the P100 latency) in GO patients without clinical signs of DON is a useful tool for the early diagnosis of optic nerve involvement.
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Keywords

subclinical optic neuropathy; Graves’ ophthalmopathy; pattern visual evoked potentials

About this article
Title

Pattern visual evoked potentials in the early diagnosis of optic neuropathy in the course of Graves’ ophthalmopathy

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 57, No 2 (2006)

Pages

122-126

Published online

2006-05-26

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2006;57(2):122-126.

Keywords

subclinical optic neuropathy
Graves’ ophthalmopathy
pattern visual evoked potentials

Authors

Przemysław Pawłowski
Janusz Myśliwiec
Małgorzata Mrugacz
Alina Bakunowicz-Łazarczyk
Maria Górska

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