open access

Vol 61, No 4 (2010)
Review article
Published online: 2010-08-31
Submitted: 2013-02-15
Get Citation

Insulin as the main regulator of cellular glucose utilization - aetiological aspects of insulin resistance

Jan Tatoń, Anna Czech, Paweł Piątkiewicz
Endokrynologia Polska 2010;61(4):388-394.

open access

Vol 61, No 4 (2010)
Review article
Published online: 2010-08-31
Submitted: 2013-02-15

Abstract

This review presents the advances in the molecular biology and the pathophysiology of insulin resistance with emphasis on disturbances in cellular glucose transport. New scientific information about the structure and function of glucotransporters from the GLUT4 and SLGT families underline their significance in endocrinopathies and metabolic disease pathogenesis as related to insulin resistance. The new discoveries in this area also contribute to a better understanding of the regulation of insulin receptor and post-receptor reactivity by hormones and by drugs. They refer to the regulation of glycaemia and to its disturbances in diabetes mellitus, particularly of type 2, to metabolic syndrome, and, in general, to the pathogenesis of many syndromes and clinical disturbances caused by insulin resistance. Impairment of cellular glucose transport may be one of the primary aetiological factors in this respect. Therefore, studies of cellular glucotransporters expression and function promise new clinical and pharmacotherapeutic developments. Progress in this area has already been transformed into many practical proposals which are improving clinical practice. (Pol J Endocrinol 2010; 61 (4): 388-394)

Abstract

This review presents the advances in the molecular biology and the pathophysiology of insulin resistance with emphasis on disturbances in cellular glucose transport. New scientific information about the structure and function of glucotransporters from the GLUT4 and SLGT families underline their significance in endocrinopathies and metabolic disease pathogenesis as related to insulin resistance. The new discoveries in this area also contribute to a better understanding of the regulation of insulin receptor and post-receptor reactivity by hormones and by drugs. They refer to the regulation of glycaemia and to its disturbances in diabetes mellitus, particularly of type 2, to metabolic syndrome, and, in general, to the pathogenesis of many syndromes and clinical disturbances caused by insulin resistance. Impairment of cellular glucose transport may be one of the primary aetiological factors in this respect. Therefore, studies of cellular glucotransporters expression and function promise new clinical and pharmacotherapeutic developments. Progress in this area has already been transformed into many practical proposals which are improving clinical practice. (Pol J Endocrinol 2010; 61 (4): 388-394)
Get Citation

Keywords

cellular glucose transport; glucotransporters; expression and action of glucotransporters; insulin; diabetes mellitus; insulin resistance

About this article
Title

Insulin as the main regulator of cellular glucose utilization - aetiological aspects of insulin resistance

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 61, No 4 (2010)

Pages

388-394

Published online

2010-08-31

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2010;61(4):388-394.

Keywords

cellular glucose transport
glucotransporters
expression and action of glucotransporters
insulin
diabetes mellitus
insulin resistance

Authors

Jan Tatoń
Anna Czech
Paweł Piątkiewicz

Important: This website uses cookies.tanya dokter More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

Via MedicaWydawcą serwisu jest  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl