Vol 62, No 4 (2011)
Original paper
Published online: 2011-08-30

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The hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype and metabolic syndrome by differing criteria in type 2 diabetic patients and their relation to lipids and blood glucose control

Saša P. Radenković, Radivoj D. Kocić, Milica M. Pešić, Dragan N. Dimić, Milena D. Velojić Golubović, Danijela B. Radojković, Vojislav M. Ćirić
Endokrynol Pol 2011;62(4):316-323.

Abstract

Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) describes clustering of obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension and increases risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The ‘hypertriglyceridemic waist’ phenotype (HTGW) represents a simple approach to identifying individuals with increased risk. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of HTGW and MetS in type 2 diabetic patients, and to examine their relation to lipids and blood glucose control.
Material and methods: 300 type 2 diabetic patients were analysed, and their history of diabetes, anthropometric measures, measurements of blood pressure (BP), lipids and glycemic control parameters were taken.
Results: In type 2 diabetic patients, the prevalence of MetS was 71.0% by the AHA/NHLBI definition and 75.33% by the IDF definition. The prevalence was 62.58% and 66.45% in men, and 80% and 84.83% in women by the same definitions, respectively. There were 41.33% of patients with HTGW (42.76% among women and 40% among men). There were statistically significant differences of age, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and postprandial glucose (PPG) in women with and without MetS according to both definitions, and of total and LDL cholesterol with and without MetS according to AHA/NHLBI (but not IDF). In men, there were statistically significant differences of total cholesterol and of HbA1c with and without MetS according to AHA/NHLBI (but not IDF). Women with HTGW had higher levels of total and LDL cholesterol, systolic and diastolic BP. Men with HTGW had higher levels of total cholesterol, diastolic BP, HbA1c, FPG and PPG.
Conclusions: Determining MetS or HTGW helps identify those with increased cardiovascular risk.
(Pol J Endocrinol 2011; 62 (4): 316–323)

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