open access

Vol 5, No 3 (2020)
Review paper
Published online: 2020-09-08
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Legal and organizational aspects of organ donation after irreversible cardiac arrest

Lukasz Szarpak, Karol Bielski, Jacek Smereka, Piotr Raczka
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.a2020.0029
·
Disaster Emerg Med J 2020;5(3):164-170.

open access

Vol 5, No 3 (2020)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-09-08

Abstract

Sudden cardiac arrest is a challenge for medical personnel. Donation after circulatory death (DCD) has
opened new perspectives and could be a valuable option to expand the brain-dead donors. The purpose
of this review is to provide an overview of current legal and organizational aspects of organ donation after
irreversible cardiac arrest. The article presents basic issues related to the epidemiology of sudden cardiac
arrest, criteria for the diagnosis of irreversible cardiac arrest. It also discusses special situations related to
cardiac arrest and determining irreversible cardiac arrest in practice. Much attention has been paid to donor
organ transplantation after irreversible cardiac arrest in the context of scientific research. This article
aimed to present the Polish statutory and administrative regulations concerning donation after circulatory
death. Following the 2010 Minister of Health’s Notice on Criteria and Methods of Determining Irreversible
Cardiac arrest, it should be stated that it legally allows for all types of donation included in the Mastricht
classification.

Abstract

Sudden cardiac arrest is a challenge for medical personnel. Donation after circulatory death (DCD) has
opened new perspectives and could be a valuable option to expand the brain-dead donors. The purpose
of this review is to provide an overview of current legal and organizational aspects of organ donation after
irreversible cardiac arrest. The article presents basic issues related to the epidemiology of sudden cardiac
arrest, criteria for the diagnosis of irreversible cardiac arrest. It also discusses special situations related to
cardiac arrest and determining irreversible cardiac arrest in practice. Much attention has been paid to donor
organ transplantation after irreversible cardiac arrest in the context of scientific research. This article
aimed to present the Polish statutory and administrative regulations concerning donation after circulatory
death. Following the 2010 Minister of Health’s Notice on Criteria and Methods of Determining Irreversible
Cardiac arrest, it should be stated that it legally allows for all types of donation included in the Mastricht
classification.

Get Citation

Keywords

irreversible cardiac arrest, transplantation, organ conditioning, legal act, cardiopulmonary resuscitation

About this article
Title

Legal and organizational aspects of organ donation after irreversible cardiac arrest

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 5, No 3 (2020)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

164-170

Published online

2020-09-08

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.a2020.0029

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2020;5(3):164-170.

Keywords

irreversible cardiac arrest
transplantation
organ conditioning
legal act
cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Authors

Lukasz Szarpak
Karol Bielski
Jacek Smereka
Piotr Raczka

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