open access

Vol 5, No 1 (2020)
Review paper
Published online: 2020-02-12
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Assessment of Chest Compression Quality — a systematic review

Tomasz Kłosiewicz, Mateusz Puślecki, Radosław Zalewski, Maciej Sip, Bartłomiej Perek
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.a2020.0010
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Disaster Emerg Med J 2020;5(1):49-56.

open access

Vol 5, No 1 (2020)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-02-12

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: High-quality chest compression (CC) is a crucial factor that determines the survival of cardiac arrest patients. Adequate quality should be featured by appropriate compression rate and depth, and full chest recoil after each compression. The ranges are strictly determined in Resuscitation Guidelines. All these parameters are interdependent. Currently, there is a need to find or develop a universal index that will enable the definition and determination of the overall quality of CCs. 

MATERIAL AND METHODS: A systematic review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, COCHRANE, and GOOGLE SCHOLAR databases was performed. The authors aimed to find papers in which the quality of CC was assessed. The extracted information included measurement of the CC quality in a direct and objective manner — by analysing the depth, rate, and recoil of CC, position of the hands, duty cycle, and indirectly by evaluating chest compression fraction (CCF). Papers describing the quality of CC based on a combination of various components of the CC quality were selected for analysis. 

RESULTS: In total 1604 publications were obtained. Among them, 21 articles satisfied the search criteria. In most of the papers, it was suggested that compressions should have been considered as correct when they met simultaneously all quality criteria. Only three papers presented any mathematical formula that could have been used for further comparisons. 

CONCLUSIONS: Although many proposals have been developed, no single, universal, and commonly accepted indicator of resuscitation quality has been so far designed and subsequently applied. Further work on this subject is warranted and strongly recommended. 

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: High-quality chest compression (CC) is a crucial factor that determines the survival of cardiac arrest patients. Adequate quality should be featured by appropriate compression rate and depth, and full chest recoil after each compression. The ranges are strictly determined in Resuscitation Guidelines. All these parameters are interdependent. Currently, there is a need to find or develop a universal index that will enable the definition and determination of the overall quality of CCs. 

MATERIAL AND METHODS: A systematic review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, COCHRANE, and GOOGLE SCHOLAR databases was performed. The authors aimed to find papers in which the quality of CC was assessed. The extracted information included measurement of the CC quality in a direct and objective manner — by analysing the depth, rate, and recoil of CC, position of the hands, duty cycle, and indirectly by evaluating chest compression fraction (CCF). Papers describing the quality of CC based on a combination of various components of the CC quality were selected for analysis. 

RESULTS: In total 1604 publications were obtained. Among them, 21 articles satisfied the search criteria. In most of the papers, it was suggested that compressions should have been considered as correct when they met simultaneously all quality criteria. Only three papers presented any mathematical formula that could have been used for further comparisons. 

CONCLUSIONS: Although many proposals have been developed, no single, universal, and commonly accepted indicator of resuscitation quality has been so far designed and subsequently applied. Further work on this subject is warranted and strongly recommended. 

Get Citation

Keywords

cardiopulmonary resuscitation; quality of health care; quality improvement; systematic review

About this article
Title

Assessment of Chest Compression Quality — a systematic review

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 5, No 1 (2020)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

49-56

Published online

2020-02-12

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.a2020.0010

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2020;5(1):49-56.

Keywords

cardiopulmonary resuscitation
quality of health care
quality improvement
systematic review

Authors

Tomasz Kłosiewicz
Mateusz Puślecki
Radosław Zalewski
Maciej Sip
Bartłomiej Perek

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