open access

Vol 3, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Published online: 2018-09-30
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The evaluation of pediatric forensic cases presented to emergency department

Atiye Kübra Ökçesiz, Nalan Kozaci, Mustafa Avci, Bulut Demirel
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0018
·
Pubmed: 26473148
·
Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(3):75-81.

open access

Vol 3, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Published online: 2018-09-30

Abstract

Introduction: Pediatric age group serves as a preparation stage for the rest of the life. This age group has specific psychological, physiological and social conditions. This present study examined pediatric forensic cases aged between 0–18. Obtained parameters determined characteristics of pediatric age group foren- sic cases. 

Methods: 1624 pediatric forensic cases aged between 0–18 who were admitted to the emergency de- partment at a tertiary healthcare service between the dates 31 October 2014 and 31 October 2016 were evaluated retrospectively. The cases were evaluated in terms of age, gender, nationality, admission time and season, reasons for presentation, radiological imaging techniques, consultation, intervention, treatment ward, clinical outcome and application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 

Results: Age average of the patients was 9,2 ± 6,2. Adolescent age group (49, 4%) was the most frequent- ly admitted after traumatization. 61% of the patients constituted male patients. An association between age and gender was not detected. The most frequent reasons for admissions were assault (28,7%) and drug intoxication (22,4%). Assault, drug intoxication, traffic accidents, substance intake, penetrating stab wounds, falling down from the height and animal bites were frequently seen in adolescents whereas sim- ple falling, corrosive substance ingestion and burn were highly seen in infants. Assault, penetrating stab wounds and gunshot injuries were detected to be frequent in males; drug and substance use was seen to be frequent in females. The patients (57%) were seen to be admitted to the emergency between the hours 1600–2400. 46.4% of the patients underwent radiological imaging. Trauma patients were seen to undergo radiological imaging more frequently. A consultation was required for 42.4% of the patients. The discharge rate of the patients from the emergency was 66.9%. Patients discharged from the emergency were seen to undergo radiography and computed tomography directly. This was found to be significantly high. 

Conclusions: Pediatric forensic cases are seen in adolescence and school-age children more frequently. The most frequent forensic cases were assaults and intoxications. Forensic cases are more frequently seen in males. Assaults are more frequent in males whereas intoxications are more frequent in females. Most of theforensiccasesaredischargedfromtheemergencydepartment. Patientsdischargedfromtheemergency undergo radiological imaging at higher rates compared to the other patients.   

Abstract

Introduction: Pediatric age group serves as a preparation stage for the rest of the life. This age group has specific psychological, physiological and social conditions. This present study examined pediatric forensic cases aged between 0–18. Obtained parameters determined characteristics of pediatric age group foren- sic cases. 

Methods: 1624 pediatric forensic cases aged between 0–18 who were admitted to the emergency de- partment at a tertiary healthcare service between the dates 31 October 2014 and 31 October 2016 were evaluated retrospectively. The cases were evaluated in terms of age, gender, nationality, admission time and season, reasons for presentation, radiological imaging techniques, consultation, intervention, treatment ward, clinical outcome and application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 

Results: Age average of the patients was 9,2 ± 6,2. Adolescent age group (49, 4%) was the most frequent- ly admitted after traumatization. 61% of the patients constituted male patients. An association between age and gender was not detected. The most frequent reasons for admissions were assault (28,7%) and drug intoxication (22,4%). Assault, drug intoxication, traffic accidents, substance intake, penetrating stab wounds, falling down from the height and animal bites were frequently seen in adolescents whereas sim- ple falling, corrosive substance ingestion and burn were highly seen in infants. Assault, penetrating stab wounds and gunshot injuries were detected to be frequent in males; drug and substance use was seen to be frequent in females. The patients (57%) were seen to be admitted to the emergency between the hours 1600–2400. 46.4% of the patients underwent radiological imaging. Trauma patients were seen to undergo radiological imaging more frequently. A consultation was required for 42.4% of the patients. The discharge rate of the patients from the emergency was 66.9%. Patients discharged from the emergency were seen to undergo radiography and computed tomography directly. This was found to be significantly high. 

Conclusions: Pediatric forensic cases are seen in adolescence and school-age children more frequently. The most frequent forensic cases were assaults and intoxications. Forensic cases are more frequently seen in males. Assaults are more frequent in males whereas intoxications are more frequent in females. Most of theforensiccasesaredischargedfromtheemergencydepartment. Patientsdischargedfromtheemergency undergo radiological imaging at higher rates compared to the other patients.   

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Keywords

trauma; child; forensic cases; radiological imaging

About this article
Title

The evaluation of pediatric forensic cases presented to emergency department

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 3, No 3 (2018)

Pages

75-81

Published online

2018-09-30

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0018

Pubmed

26473148

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(3):75-81.

Keywords

trauma
child
forensic cases
radiological imaging

Authors

Atiye Kübra Ökçesiz
Nalan Kozaci
Mustafa Avci
Bulut Demirel

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