open access

Vol 3, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-09-27
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Prehospital CPR training performed with visual feedback

Anna Abelsson, Lars Lundberg
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0010
·
Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(2):41-45.

open access

Vol 3, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-09-27

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Swedish firefighters are a part of the emergency medical services. Therefore, they perform prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on a regular basis. Training becomes crucial for maintaining the CPR skills and increasing the patients’ chances of survival. Training with visual feedback is for Swedish firefighters a new way of training CPR. The aim of this study was to evaluate firefighters’ perception of a CPR manikin with visual feedback.

METHOD: This study had a qualitative approach. Data were collected by interviews with 16 firefighters after performing CPR on a manikin with visual feedback. The data were analyzed with a manifest content analysis.

RESULTS: Visual feedback makes it easy to identify and maintain correct compression rate. There is a need for identifying too deep compressions. Uncertainty regarding the closeness to the stomach arises when using the whole hand during compressions instead of just the wrist. To accomplish an open airway requires a bit of adjustment of the manikins’ head.

DISCUSSION: To train and learn CPR is feasible with visual feedback. The firefighters can maintaing a correct compression rate and correct compression depth during the sessions. Ventilating a patient with bag-valvemask or pocket mask may require training with visual feedback to guarantee the firefighters being able to secure an open airway of the patient. All these skills are essential and improve the chance of survival for the patients.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Swedish firefighters are a part of the emergency medical services. Therefore, they perform prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on a regular basis. Training becomes crucial for maintaining the CPR skills and increasing the patients’ chances of survival. Training with visual feedback is for Swedish firefighters a new way of training CPR. The aim of this study was to evaluate firefighters’ perception of a CPR manikin with visual feedback.

METHOD: This study had a qualitative approach. Data were collected by interviews with 16 firefighters after performing CPR on a manikin with visual feedback. The data were analyzed with a manifest content analysis.

RESULTS: Visual feedback makes it easy to identify and maintain correct compression rate. There is a need for identifying too deep compressions. Uncertainty regarding the closeness to the stomach arises when using the whole hand during compressions instead of just the wrist. To accomplish an open airway requires a bit of adjustment of the manikins’ head.

DISCUSSION: To train and learn CPR is feasible with visual feedback. The firefighters can maintaing a correct compression rate and correct compression depth during the sessions. Ventilating a patient with bag-valvemask or pocket mask may require training with visual feedback to guarantee the firefighters being able to secure an open airway of the patient. All these skills are essential and improve the chance of survival for the patients.

Get Citation

Keywords

Firefighter; Emergency Medical Service; CPR; Manikin; Visual feedback

About this article
Title

Prehospital CPR training performed with visual feedback

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 3, No 2 (2018)

Pages

41-45

Published online

2018-09-27

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0010

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(2):41-45.

Keywords

Firefighter
Emergency Medical Service
CPR
Manikin
Visual feedback

Authors

Anna Abelsson
Lars Lundberg

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