open access

Vol 2, No 3 (2017)
REVIEW ARTICLE
Published online: 2017-10-20
Get Citation

In situ simulation of cardiac arrest

Michael Czekajlo, Agata Dabrowska
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.2017.0025
·
Disaster Emerg Med J 2017;2(3):116-119.

open access

Vol 2, No 3 (2017)
REVIEW ARTICLE
Published online: 2017-10-20

Abstract

In-hospital cardiac arrest is one of the most complicated events healthcare providers will manage in a hospital setting. Cardiac arrest also is a rare event compared to other clinical events managed on a routine basis, requiring deliberate preparation of staff to be able to have the knowledge, technical skills and teamwork necessary to manage such an event when it occurs.

Simulation-based education has been demonstrated to be an effective method of educating healthcare providers. More recently, hospital systems have begun using in situ simulation for the training of healthcare providers and identifying latent safety threats.

In situ simulation is defined as: “Taking place in the actual patient care setting/environment in an effort to achieve a high level of fidelity and realism; this training is particularly suitable for difficult work environments, due to space constraints or noise”.

Abstract

In-hospital cardiac arrest is one of the most complicated events healthcare providers will manage in a hospital setting. Cardiac arrest also is a rare event compared to other clinical events managed on a routine basis, requiring deliberate preparation of staff to be able to have the knowledge, technical skills and teamwork necessary to manage such an event when it occurs.

Simulation-based education has been demonstrated to be an effective method of educating healthcare providers. More recently, hospital systems have begun using in situ simulation for the training of healthcare providers and identifying latent safety threats.

In situ simulation is defined as: “Taking place in the actual patient care setting/environment in an effort to achieve a high level of fidelity and realism; this training is particularly suitable for difficult work environments, due to space constraints or noise”.

Get Citation

Keywords

in-hospital cardiac arrest, resuscitation, education, in situ, medical simulation

About this article
Title

In situ simulation of cardiac arrest

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 2, No 3 (2017)

Pages

116-119

Published online

2017-10-20

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.2017.0025

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2017;2(3):116-119.

Keywords

in-hospital cardiac arrest
resuscitation
education
in situ
medical simulation

Authors

Michael Czekajlo
Agata Dabrowska

References (9)
  1. Issenberg SB, McGaghie WC, Petrusa ER, et al. Features and uses of high-fidelity medical simulations that lead to effective learning: a BEME systematic review. Med Teach. 2005; 27(1): 10–28.
  2. Guise JM, Mladenovic J. In situ simulation: identification of systems issues. Semin Perinatol. 2013; 37(3): 161–165.
  3. Walker ST, Sevdalis N, McKay A, et al. Unannounced in situ simulations: integrating training and clinical practice. BMJ Qual Saf. 2013; 22(6): 453–458.
  4. Lopreiato JO, Downing D, Gammon W. Healthcare Simulation Dictionary. 2016. Retrieved from www.ssih.org/dictionary.
  5. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. 2004 Institute for Healthcare Improvement.
  6. Patterson MD, Geis GL, Falcone RA, et al. In situ simulation: detection of safety threats and teamwork training in a high risk emergency department. BMJ Qual Saf. 2013; 22(6): 468–477.
  7. 2015 AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC. https://eccguidelines.heart.org/index.php/circulation/cpr-ecc-guidelines-2/.
  8. Zimmermann K, Holzinger IB, Ganassi L, et al. Inter-professional in-situ simulated team and resuscitation training for patient safety: Description and impact of a programmatic approach. BMC Med Educ. 2015; 15: 189.
  9. Mundell WC, Kennedy CC, Szostek JH, et al. Simulation technology for resuscitation training: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Resuscitation. 2013; 84(9): 1174–1183.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, fax:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl