open access

Vol 2, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Published online: 2017-05-24
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Impact of a corpuls CPR Mechanical Chest Compression Device on chest compression quality during extended pediatric manikin resuscitation: a randomized crossover pilot study

Wojciech Wieczorek, Halla Kaminska
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.2017.0012
·
Disaster Emerg Med J 2017;2(2):58-63.

open access

Vol 2, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Published online: 2017-05-24

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The quality of chest compression delivered during paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation is identified as the most important factor to achieve the increase of the survival rate without a major neu­rological deficit to the patients. The aim of this study was to compare chest compression quality with and without the CORPULS CPR mechanical chest compression device during simulated paediatric cardiopulmo­nary resuscitation.

METHODS: A randomized crossover simulation trial was designed. 24 experienced paramedics participated in this trial. They performed paediatric chest compression with and without the CORPULS CPR chest compres­sion device on a HAL® S3005 five year old paediatric simulator. They performed single-rescuer continuous chest compression in a 2-min scenario. The primary endpoint was compression depth.

RESULTS: The mean compression depth without CORPULS CPR was 4.7 ± 0.2 cm and was statistically signif­icant lower than when CORPULS CPR was used 7 ± 0.3 cm. The mean compression rate with and without CORPULS CPR was differentiated: 94 ± 1 vs. 100 ± 5.

CONCLUSIONS: This simulated scenario study showed that manual chest compression allows one to adjust the compression depth more precisely in comparison to CORPULS CPR device. The system compressed the simulator chest too deeply.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The quality of chest compression delivered during paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation is identified as the most important factor to achieve the increase of the survival rate without a major neu­rological deficit to the patients. The aim of this study was to compare chest compression quality with and without the CORPULS CPR mechanical chest compression device during simulated paediatric cardiopulmo­nary resuscitation.

METHODS: A randomized crossover simulation trial was designed. 24 experienced paramedics participated in this trial. They performed paediatric chest compression with and without the CORPULS CPR chest compres­sion device on a HAL® S3005 five year old paediatric simulator. They performed single-rescuer continuous chest compression in a 2-min scenario. The primary endpoint was compression depth.

RESULTS: The mean compression depth without CORPULS CPR was 4.7 ± 0.2 cm and was statistically signif­icant lower than when CORPULS CPR was used 7 ± 0.3 cm. The mean compression rate with and without CORPULS CPR was differentiated: 94 ± 1 vs. 100 ± 5.

CONCLUSIONS: This simulated scenario study showed that manual chest compression allows one to adjust the compression depth more precisely in comparison to CORPULS CPR device. The system compressed the simulator chest too deeply.

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Keywords

chest compression, quality, paramedic, cardiac arrest, paediatric

About this article
Title

Impact of a corpuls CPR Mechanical Chest Compression Device on chest compression quality during extended pediatric manikin resuscitation: a randomized crossover pilot study

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 2, No 2 (2017)

Pages

58-63

Published online

2017-05-24

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.2017.0012

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2017;2(2):58-63.

Keywords

chest compression
quality
paramedic
cardiac arrest
paediatric

Authors

Wojciech Wieczorek
Halla Kaminska

References (16)
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