open access

Vol 2, No 1 (2017)
REVIEW ARTICLE
Published online: 2017-03-31
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Intraosseous access — future, present and everyday life

Agata Dabrowska, Marek Dabrowski, Karol Bielski, Adrian Maciejewski, Emilia Surzyn
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.2017.0004
·
Disaster Emerg Med J 2017;2(1):19-26.

open access

Vol 2, No 1 (2017)
REVIEW ARTICLE
Published online: 2017-03-31

Abstract

Today, intraosseous access (IO) is not only an alternative method of administration of pharmacotherapy or fluids; it is often used in life-threatening conditions. Although previously, it was a method commonly used in paediatrics or in the military, for several years it has been advocated as the primary access point for patients in a critical condition. While this applies mainly to children, it may also include adults in a hospital setting, as well as in the emergency department. Oftentimes it is used when intravenous access is difficult or the patient is seriously ill. Many scientific circles at the American Heart Association (AHA) and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) approve this method.

Abstract

Today, intraosseous access (IO) is not only an alternative method of administration of pharmacotherapy or fluids; it is often used in life-threatening conditions. Although previously, it was a method commonly used in paediatrics or in the military, for several years it has been advocated as the primary access point for patients in a critical condition. While this applies mainly to children, it may also include adults in a hospital setting, as well as in the emergency department. Oftentimes it is used when intravenous access is difficult or the patient is seriously ill. Many scientific circles at the American Heart Association (AHA) and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) approve this method.

Get Citation

Keywords

intraosseous access (IO), intravenous access (IV), life-threatening condition, BIG, FAST, NIO

About this article
Title

Intraosseous access — future, present and everyday life

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 2, No 1 (2017)

Pages

19-26

Published online

2017-03-31

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.2017.0004

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2017;2(1):19-26.

Keywords

intraosseous access (IO)
intravenous access (IV)
life-threatening condition
BIG
FAST
NIO

Authors

Agata Dabrowska
Marek Dabrowski
Karol Bielski
Adrian Maciejewski
Emilia Surzyn

References (28)
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