open access

Vol 11, No 2 (2022)
Research paper
Submitted: 2021-11-30
Accepted: 2021-12-09
Published online: 2022-03-03
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The Effect of Hydroalcoholic Seed Extract of Securigera Securidaca on the Hepatic Renin-Angiotensin System in the Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Animal Model

Bahar Kiani1, Shahin Alizadeh-Fanalou2, Fatemeh Khomari1, Mohammad Babaei3, Iraj Alipourfard4, Ali Kalantari Hesari5, Mohammad Najafi1, Ali-Mohammad Sharifi6, Elham Bahreini1
DOI: 10.5603/DK.a2022.0013
·
Clinical Diabetology 2022;11(2):97-106.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Islamic Republic Of
  2. Nephrology and Kidney Transplant Center, Clinical Research Institute, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran, Islamic Republic Of
  3. Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan, Iran, Islamic Republic Of
  4. Institute of Biology, Biotechnology and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
  5. Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan, Iran, Islamic Republic Of
  6. Razi Drug Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Islamic Republic Of

open access

Vol 11, No 2 (2022)
Original articles
Submitted: 2021-11-30
Accepted: 2021-12-09
Published online: 2022-03-03

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of hydroalcoholic seed extract of Securigera securidaca (S. securidaca) (HESS) on liver local reninangiotensin system (RAS) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Methods: Three groups of diabetic male Wistar rats were treated with different doses of HESS (100, 200, 400 mg/Kg-BW), and the results were compared with diabetic and healthy control groups. To test the effects of HESS on liver local RAS as well as its alternative pathway, the tissue levels of renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2, angiotensin-II (Ang-II), and Ang-(1-7) were measured. The oxidative state of liver tissue was evaluated by biomarkers of malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant status (TOS), and total antioxidant status (TAS). Due to the association between local RAS activity and tissue inflammation, the production of interleukins (IL) IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alfa (TNF-a), and IL-10 in the liver was assayed in the experimental group. Results: Dose-dependent effects of HESS showed that the highest dose of the extract had a reducing effect on the hepatic levels of local RAS components including angiotensinogen, ACE, and Ang-II. Surprisingly, despite the decrease in tissue level of ACE2, an increase in Ang-(1-7) tissue concentration was observed. Decreased local RAS activity through treatment with the highest dose of HESS was associated with decreased tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-a), and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). Most of the effects of the extract are attributed to its antioxidant properties. Conclusions: S. securidaca seed can be suggested as a suitable drug supplement to prevent hepatic complications of diabetes.

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of hydroalcoholic seed extract of Securigera securidaca (S. securidaca) (HESS) on liver local reninangiotensin system (RAS) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Methods: Three groups of diabetic male Wistar rats were treated with different doses of HESS (100, 200, 400 mg/Kg-BW), and the results were compared with diabetic and healthy control groups. To test the effects of HESS on liver local RAS as well as its alternative pathway, the tissue levels of renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2, angiotensin-II (Ang-II), and Ang-(1-7) were measured. The oxidative state of liver tissue was evaluated by biomarkers of malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant status (TOS), and total antioxidant status (TAS). Due to the association between local RAS activity and tissue inflammation, the production of interleukins (IL) IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alfa (TNF-a), and IL-10 in the liver was assayed in the experimental group. Results: Dose-dependent effects of HESS showed that the highest dose of the extract had a reducing effect on the hepatic levels of local RAS components including angiotensinogen, ACE, and Ang-II. Surprisingly, despite the decrease in tissue level of ACE2, an increase in Ang-(1-7) tissue concentration was observed. Decreased local RAS activity through treatment with the highest dose of HESS was associated with decreased tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-a), and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). Most of the effects of the extract are attributed to its antioxidant properties. Conclusions: S. securidaca seed can be suggested as a suitable drug supplement to prevent hepatic complications of diabetes.

Get Citation

Keywords

local renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin-converting enzyme, renin, angiotensin-II, angiotensin-(1–7), angiotensinogen

About this article
Title

The Effect of Hydroalcoholic Seed Extract of Securigera Securidaca on the Hepatic Renin-Angiotensin System in the Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Animal Model

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 11, No 2 (2022)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

97-106

Published online

2022-03-03

Page views

273

Article views/downloads

77

DOI

10.5603/DK.a2022.0013

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2022;11(2):97-106.

Keywords

local renin-angiotensin system (RAS)
angiotensin-converting enzyme
renin
angiotensin-II
angiotensin-(1–7)
angiotensinogen

Authors

Bahar Kiani
Shahin Alizadeh-Fanalou
Fatemeh Khomari
Mohammad Babaei
Iraj Alipourfard
Ali Kalantari Hesari
Mohammad Najafi
Ali-Mohammad Sharifi
Elham Bahreini

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