open access

Vol 11, No 2 (2022)
Research paper
Submitted: 2021-09-22
Accepted: 2021-10-24
Published online: 2022-02-02
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Study of the Relationship between Serum Asprosin, Endothelial Dysfunction and Insulin Resistance

Kamel Hemida Rohoma1, Aly Ahmed Abdellrahim1, Reham Abdel Haleem Abo Elwafa2, Mohamed Galal Moawad3
DOI: 10.5603/DK.a2022.0006
·
Clinical Diabetology 2022;11(2):73-79.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt
  2. Chemical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt
  3. Department of Internal Medicine, Alexandria Fever Hospital, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt

open access

Vol 11, No 2 (2022)
Original articles
Submitted: 2021-09-22
Accepted: 2021-10-24
Published online: 2022-02-02

Abstract

Background: Until now, the relationship between asprosin and soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) as well as the role of asprosin in diabetes are still unclear. This work aimed to assess the relationship between fasting serum asprosin and markers of endothelial dysfunction and metabolic parameters, namely, sE-selectin, fasting insulin, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HOmeostatic Model Assesment – Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), fasting lipid profile, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among people with different spectra of glycemia including normal subjects, impaired glucose tolerance (IGR), and subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Ninety subjects were recruited and divided according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) diagnostic criteria into three groups; subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 30), subjects with impaired glucose resistance (n = 30), and control subjects (n = 30). All groups were subjected to thorough history taking, physical examination, and laboratory investigation, involving fasting asprosin, sE-selectin, and HOMA-IR. Results: The univariate analysis showed a significant positive correlation between asprosin and glycemic parameters, insulin resistance, obesity parameters, and endothelial dysfunction in the three groups. However, multivariate analysis showed that triglycerides and sE-selectin are the most independent factors affecting asprosin. Univariate analysis for parameters affecting sE-selectin showed that asprosin is significantly correlated with sE-selectin, and multivariate analysis revealed that asprosin was the most independent factor affecting sE-selectin. Conclusions: Our study showed a significant positive correlation between asprosin, glucose dysregulation, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction.

Abstract

Background: Until now, the relationship between asprosin and soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) as well as the role of asprosin in diabetes are still unclear. This work aimed to assess the relationship between fasting serum asprosin and markers of endothelial dysfunction and metabolic parameters, namely, sE-selectin, fasting insulin, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HOmeostatic Model Assesment – Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), fasting lipid profile, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among people with different spectra of glycemia including normal subjects, impaired glucose tolerance (IGR), and subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Ninety subjects were recruited and divided according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) diagnostic criteria into three groups; subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 30), subjects with impaired glucose resistance (n = 30), and control subjects (n = 30). All groups were subjected to thorough history taking, physical examination, and laboratory investigation, involving fasting asprosin, sE-selectin, and HOMA-IR. Results: The univariate analysis showed a significant positive correlation between asprosin and glycemic parameters, insulin resistance, obesity parameters, and endothelial dysfunction in the three groups. However, multivariate analysis showed that triglycerides and sE-selectin are the most independent factors affecting asprosin. Univariate analysis for parameters affecting sE-selectin showed that asprosin is significantly correlated with sE-selectin, and multivariate analysis revealed that asprosin was the most independent factor affecting sE-selectin. Conclusions: Our study showed a significant positive correlation between asprosin, glucose dysregulation, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction.

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Keywords

asprosin, endothelial dysfunction, souble E-selectin, insulin resistance

About this article
Title

Study of the Relationship between Serum Asprosin, Endothelial Dysfunction and Insulin Resistance

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 11, No 2 (2022)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

73-79

Published online

2022-02-02

Page views

357

Article views/downloads

83

DOI

10.5603/DK.a2022.0006

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2022;11(2):73-79.

Keywords

asprosin
endothelial dysfunction
souble E-selectin
insulin resistance

Authors

Kamel Hemida Rohoma
Aly Ahmed Abdellrahim
Reham Abdel Haleem Abo Elwafa
Mohamed Galal Moawad

References (13)
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