open access

Vol 11, No 1 (2022)
Research paper
Submitted: 2021-01-29
Accepted: 2021-04-03
Published online: 2022-01-27
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Factors associated with knowledge level in adult type 1 diabetic patients

Meriem Yazidi1, Radhouane Gharbi1, Fatma Chaker1, Ibtissem Oueslati1, Wafa Grira1, Nadia Khessairi1, Melika Chihaoui1
DOI: 10.5603/DK.a2022.0001
·
Clinical Diabetology 2022;11(1):1-5.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Endocrinology, University of Tunis El Manar, Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, La Rabta Hospital, Tunis, Tunisia

open access

Vol 11, No 1 (2022)
Original articles
Submitted: 2021-01-29
Accepted: 2021-04-03
Published online: 2022-01-27

Abstract

Background: The objective of the study is to determine the factors associated with the level of knowledge of Tunisian type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients in adulthood. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study including 93 T1D patients over 18 years old. The knowledge assessment was carried out by a questionnaire rated out of 20 points. The subjects with an „unsatisfactory” level of knowledge (score < 10/20) were compared with subjects whose level of knowledge was „satisfactory” according to their socio-demographic, clinical, and paraclinical characteristics. Results: The mean age of the patients was 37.2 ± 12.4 years. The level of knowledge was „unsatisfactory” in 21 patients (23%). After univariate analysis, an „unsatisfactory” level of knowledge was associated with a low level of education (p = 0.001), a poor socioeconomic level (p = 0.03), a poor glycemic control (p = 0.003) and the absence of self-monitoring (p = 0.002). After multivariate analysis, only a low level of education and a lack of practice of self-monitoring were associated with an „unsatisfactory” level of knowledge (respectively p = 0.03 and 0.03; adjusted OR [95% confidence interval] = 7.3 [1.2–43.5] and 13.7 [1.3–143.3]). Conclusions: The factors independently associated with the level of knowledge in adult T1D patients are the level of education and the practice of self-monitoring. This encourages better tailoring of educational messages to patients with low levels of education and suggests that a better level of knowledge ensures better self-management of diabetes. However, the relationship with the quality of glycemic control remains uncertain.

Abstract

Background: The objective of the study is to determine the factors associated with the level of knowledge of Tunisian type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients in adulthood. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study including 93 T1D patients over 18 years old. The knowledge assessment was carried out by a questionnaire rated out of 20 points. The subjects with an „unsatisfactory” level of knowledge (score < 10/20) were compared with subjects whose level of knowledge was „satisfactory” according to their socio-demographic, clinical, and paraclinical characteristics. Results: The mean age of the patients was 37.2 ± 12.4 years. The level of knowledge was „unsatisfactory” in 21 patients (23%). After univariate analysis, an „unsatisfactory” level of knowledge was associated with a low level of education (p = 0.001), a poor socioeconomic level (p = 0.03), a poor glycemic control (p = 0.003) and the absence of self-monitoring (p = 0.002). After multivariate analysis, only a low level of education and a lack of practice of self-monitoring were associated with an „unsatisfactory” level of knowledge (respectively p = 0.03 and 0.03; adjusted OR [95% confidence interval] = 7.3 [1.2–43.5] and 13.7 [1.3–143.3]). Conclusions: The factors independently associated with the level of knowledge in adult T1D patients are the level of education and the practice of self-monitoring. This encourages better tailoring of educational messages to patients with low levels of education and suggests that a better level of knowledge ensures better self-management of diabetes. However, the relationship with the quality of glycemic control remains uncertain.

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Keywords

type 1 diabetes, knowledge, therapeutic education, adult

About this article
Title

Factors associated with knowledge level in adult type 1 diabetic patients

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 11, No 1 (2022)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

1-5

Published online

2022-01-27

Page views

613

Article views/downloads

104

DOI

10.5603/DK.a2022.0001

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2022;11(1):1-5.

Keywords

type 1 diabetes
knowledge
therapeutic education
adult

Authors

Meriem Yazidi
Radhouane Gharbi
Fatma Chaker
Ibtissem Oueslati
Wafa Grira
Nadia Khessairi
Melika Chihaoui

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