open access

Vol 9, No 3 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-04-08
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Magnesium, zinc and iron serum levels as potential parameters significant for effective glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes

Igor Marjanac, Borna Biljan, Ena Husarić, Silvija Canecki-Varžić, Jasna Pavela, Robert Lovrić
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2020.0014
·
Clinical Diabetology 2020;9(3):161-166.

open access

Vol 9, No 3 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-04-08

Abstract

Background. Various trace elements contribute to the development of diabetes and its complications through their roles in glucose metabolism and the oxidative stress response. The aim of this study was to ascertain the difference in serum magnesium, zinc and iron concentrations between healthy children and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This study also aimed to determine whether serum concentrations of magnesium, zinc, and iron in children with T1DM correlated with the duration of the disease and the quality of glycemic control in this group.

Material and methods. A total of 99 children with T1DM and 40 healthy children were included in this study. Magnesium, zinc and iron serum levels were assessed using the photometric method.

Results. Significantly lower levels of magnesium and zinc (P < 0.001) were observed, between the T1DM group and the healthy control group but no statistically significant differences were found in iron levels (P = 0.13) between the two groups. While there were no statistically significant differences in serum concentrations with respect to the duration of disease, it was, however, discovered that children with poorer glycemic control had significantly lower serum zinc concentrations (P < 0.001) while magnesium and iron levels remained similar (P = 0.07 and 0.21 respectively).

Conclusion. This study found that while there was no significant difference in iron serum levels in children with T1DM compared to healthy controls, children with T1DM did have more significantly decreased magnesium and zinc serum levels than the control group. Serum zinc levels in this study also directly correlated to poorer glycemic control. Further studies are required to explore whether magnesium and zinc supplementa­tion, or nutritional intake, could potentially be used to achieve better glycemic control in children with T1DM.

Abstract

Background. Various trace elements contribute to the development of diabetes and its complications through their roles in glucose metabolism and the oxidative stress response. The aim of this study was to ascertain the difference in serum magnesium, zinc and iron concentrations between healthy children and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This study also aimed to determine whether serum concentrations of magnesium, zinc, and iron in children with T1DM correlated with the duration of the disease and the quality of glycemic control in this group.

Material and methods. A total of 99 children with T1DM and 40 healthy children were included in this study. Magnesium, zinc and iron serum levels were assessed using the photometric method.

Results. Significantly lower levels of magnesium and zinc (P < 0.001) were observed, between the T1DM group and the healthy control group but no statistically significant differences were found in iron levels (P = 0.13) between the two groups. While there were no statistically significant differences in serum concentrations with respect to the duration of disease, it was, however, discovered that children with poorer glycemic control had significantly lower serum zinc concentrations (P < 0.001) while magnesium and iron levels remained similar (P = 0.07 and 0.21 respectively).

Conclusion. This study found that while there was no significant difference in iron serum levels in children with T1DM compared to healthy controls, children with T1DM did have more significantly decreased magnesium and zinc serum levels than the control group. Serum zinc levels in this study also directly correlated to poorer glycemic control. Further studies are required to explore whether magnesium and zinc supplementa­tion, or nutritional intake, could potentially be used to achieve better glycemic control in children with T1DM.

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Keywords

iron, magnesium, zinc, diabetes mellitus, type 1, child, supplements

About this article
Title

Magnesium, zinc and iron serum levels as potential parameters significant for effective glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 9, No 3 (2020)

Pages

161-166

Published online

2020-04-08

DOI

10.5603/DK.2020.0014

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2020;9(3):161-166.

Keywords

iron
magnesium
zinc
diabetes mellitus
type 1
child
supplements

Authors

Igor Marjanac
Borna Biljan
Ena Husarić
Silvija Canecki-Varžić
Jasna Pavela
Robert Lovrić

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