open access

Vol 8, No 6 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-01-23
Get Citation

Health care seeking behaviors in type 2 diabetic patients in East Azerbaijan

Habib Jalilian, Mohammad Zakaria Pezeshki, Leila Torkzadeh, Elnaz Javanshir, Ahmad Moradi, Rahim Khodayari Zarnaq
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2019.0031
·
Clinical Diabetology 2019;8(6):292-302.

open access

Vol 8, No 6 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-01-23

Abstract

Background. Timely and effective use of health care services is essential to delay or prevent complications and reduce the burden of diabetes. Positive health care seeking behaviors can improve diabetes control and, as a result, reduce the incidence of the complications. So, this study aimed to investigate the status of health care seeking behaviors and affecting factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and methods. This was a cross-sectional study. There were 1139 patients with type 2 diabetes aged > 18 years selected who referred to educational hospitals, Endocrinologist office, primary health care centers, and Clinics. Data collected using a researchermade questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS software version 22. Results. 36.3% of diabetic patients initially referred to a physician in the event of illness symptoms, and 70.7% of patients referred to a physician in case of exacerbating of disease symptoms. 58.4% of patients preferred to consult a specialist directly. 78.85 of patients reported that they had referred to a physician on a regular basis and 59.9% of patients followed up their treatment process on a regular basis. The physician was the main source of information for the majority of patients. Income, education and health insurance status, disease severity, chronicity of DM, the history of hospitalization due to DM were the affecting factors on health care seeking behaviors (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Most of the diabetics often did not follow the official structure of health care providing to manage their illness, and despite the referral system and family practitioner program more than half of the patients went directly to the specialist physician’s office. Factors related to the patient (an income and education status), disease characteristics (disease severity, chronicity of DM and the history of hospitalization due to DM) and health care system factors (type of the basic insurance and supplementary insurance status) affect the health care seeking behaviors.

Abstract

Background. Timely and effective use of health care services is essential to delay or prevent complications and reduce the burden of diabetes. Positive health care seeking behaviors can improve diabetes control and, as a result, reduce the incidence of the complications. So, this study aimed to investigate the status of health care seeking behaviors and affecting factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and methods. This was a cross-sectional study. There were 1139 patients with type 2 diabetes aged > 18 years selected who referred to educational hospitals, Endocrinologist office, primary health care centers, and Clinics. Data collected using a researchermade questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS software version 22. Results. 36.3% of diabetic patients initially referred to a physician in the event of illness symptoms, and 70.7% of patients referred to a physician in case of exacerbating of disease symptoms. 58.4% of patients preferred to consult a specialist directly. 78.85 of patients reported that they had referred to a physician on a regular basis and 59.9% of patients followed up their treatment process on a regular basis. The physician was the main source of information for the majority of patients. Income, education and health insurance status, disease severity, chronicity of DM, the history of hospitalization due to DM were the affecting factors on health care seeking behaviors (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Most of the diabetics often did not follow the official structure of health care providing to manage their illness, and despite the referral system and family practitioner program more than half of the patients went directly to the specialist physician’s office. Factors related to the patient (an income and education status), disease characteristics (disease severity, chronicity of DM and the history of hospitalization due to DM) and health care system factors (type of the basic insurance and supplementary insurance status) affect the health care seeking behaviors.

Get Citation

Keywords

health-seeking behaviors, healthcare seeking behaviors, help-seeking behavior, information seeking behavior, treatment seeking behavior, type 2 diabetes mellitus

About this article
Title

Health care seeking behaviors in type 2 diabetic patients in East Azerbaijan

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 8, No 6 (2019)

Pages

292-302

Published online

2020-01-23

DOI

10.5603/DK.2019.0031

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2019;8(6):292-302.

Keywords

health-seeking behaviors
healthcare seeking behaviors
help-seeking behavior
information seeking behavior
treatment seeking behavior
type 2 diabetes mellitus

Authors

Habib Jalilian
Mohammad Zakaria Pezeshki
Leila Torkzadeh
Elnaz Javanshir
Ahmad Moradi
Rahim Khodayari Zarnaq

References (30)
  1. Hjelm K, Atwine F. Health-care seeking behaviour among persons with diabetes in Uganda: an interview study. BMC Int Health Hum Rights. 2011; 11: 11.
  2. Conca T, Saint-Pierre C, Herskovic V, et al. Multidisciplinary collaboration in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care: analysis using process mining. J Med Internet Res. 2018; 20(4): e127.
  3. Gucciardi E, Espin S, Morganti A, et al. Exploring interprofessional collaboration during the integration of diabetes teams into primary care. BMC Fam Pract. 2016; 17: 12.
  4. Lim SS, Gaziano TA, Gakidou E, et al. Prevention of cardiovascular disease in high-risk individuals in low-income and middle-income countries: health effects and costs. Lancet. 2007; 370(9604): 2054–2062.
  5. Olenja J. Health seeking behaviour in context. East Afr Med J. 2003; 80(2): 61–62.
  6. Ali M, de Muynck A. Illness incidence and health seeking behaviour among street children in Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan — a qualitative study. Child Care Health Dev. 2005; 31(5): 525–532.
  7. Gazmararian JA, Ziemer DC, Barnes C. Perception of barriers to self-care management among diabetic patients. Diabetes Educ. 2009; 35(5): 778–788.
  8. Dominguez RJ. Health-seeking behavior of patients with diabetes mellitus in Baguio City. 2010.
  9. Gentili PMA, Grieco R, Santini A. Influence of patients' representations and beliefs about diabetes and its treatment on their adherence to therapy. Diabetes Nutrition and Metabolism. 2001; 14(3): 140–152.
  10. Espinosa P, Espinosa M. Health-Seeking behavior and quality of life of patients with diabetes mellitus in Ioilo, Philippines. International Journal of Bio-Science and Bio-Technology. 2017; 9(1): 103–112.
  11. Mayxay M, Hansana V, Sengphilom B, et al. Respiratory illness healthcare-seeking behavior assessment in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos). BMC Public Health. 2013; 13: 444.
  12. Nimesh VV, Halder A, Mitra A, et al. Patterns of healthcare seeking behavior among persons with diabetes in Central India: A mixed method study. J Family Med Prim Care. 2019; 8(2): 677–683.
  13. Spikmans FJM, Brug J, Doven MMB, et al. Why do diabetic patients not attend appointments with their dietitian? J Hum Nutr Diet. 2003; 16(3): 151–158.
  14. Venmans LM, Gorter KJ, Hak E, et al. Short-term effects of an educational program on health-seeking behavior for infections in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled intervention trial in primary care. Diabetes Care. 2008; 31(3): 402–407.
  15. Mehrdad R. Health system in Iran. JMAJ. 2009; 52(1): 69–73.
  16. Verulava T. Health care system in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Insurance, Health Policy & Management. 2006.
  17. Rasoulynejad S. Study of self-referral factors in the three-level healthcare delivery system, Kashan, Iran, 2000. Rural Remote Health. 2004; 4(4): 237.
  18. Kavosi Z, Siavashi EA. Study of the Performance of Referral System in Urban Family Physician Program in Fars Province, Iran. Journal of Health Management and Informatics. 2018; 5(3): 88–95.
  19. Musinguzi G, Anthierens S, Nuwaha F, et al. Factors Influencing Compliance and Health Seeking Behaviour for Hypertension in Mukono and Buikwe in Uganda: A Qualitative Study. Int J Hypertens. 2018; 2018: 8307591.
  20. Dawood OT, Hassali MA, Saleem F, et al. Assessment of health seeking behaviour and self-medication among general public in the state of Penang, Malaysia. Pharm Pract (Granada). 2017; 15(3): 991.
  21. Bhosale S, Pawar A, K D. Healthcare-seeking behavior among diabetic patients in Kozhikode, Kerala. International Journal of Medical Science and Public Health. 2017; 6(10): 1524–1528.
  22. Abidin SI, Sutan R, Shamsuddin K. Prevalence and determinants of appropriate health seeking behaviour among known diabetics: results from a community-based survey. Advances in Epidemiology. 2014; 2014: 1–7.
  23. Makinga PN, Beke A. A cross-sectional survey on the lifestyle and health-seeking behaviour of Basotho patients with diabetes. South African Family Practice. 2014; 55(2): 190–195.
  24. Jin Y, Zhu W, Yuan B, et al. Impact of health workforce availability on health care seeking behavior of patients with diabetes mellitus in China. Int J Equity Health. 2017; 16(1): 80.
  25. Egede LE, Ye X, Zheng D, et al. The prevalence and pattern of complementary and alternative medicine use in individuals with diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2002; 25(2): 324–329.
  26. Hasan SS, Ahmed SI, Bukhari NI, et al. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among patients with chronic diseases at outpatient clinics. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2009; 15(3): 152–157.
  27. Kim J, Chan MM. Factors influencing preferences for alternative medicine by Korean Americans. Am J Chin Med. 2004; 32(2): 321–329.
  28. Lui CW, Dower Jo, Donald M, et al. Patterns and Determinants of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Practitioner Use among Adults with Diabetes in Queensland, Australia. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012; 2012: 659419.
  29. Sethi A, Srivastava S, Madhu SV. Prevalence and pattern of use of indigenous medicines in diabetic patients attending a tertiary care centre. J Indian Med Assoc. 2011; 109(7): 469–471.
  30. Kuske S, Schiereck T, Grobosch S, et al. Diabetes-related information-seeking behaviour: a systematic review. Syst Rev. 2017; 6(1): 212.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

 

Wydawcą serwisu jest  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl