open access

Vol 8, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-06-19
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Psychological well-being and diabetes-related distress in states of type 2 diabetes in the first multi-national Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) Study

Mark Peyrot, Soren E Skovlund, Rafał Radzio, Andrzej Kokoszka
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2019.0012
·
Clinical Diabetology 2019;8(3):167-175.

open access

Vol 8, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-06-19

Abstract

Purpose. To examine well-being and diabetes-related distress across several common states differentiated in the course of type 2 diabetes.

Material and methods. Random samples of adults with type 2 diabetes were obtained from multiple co- untries in the first DAWN (Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes, and Needs) Study (n = 3432). All data were obtained during structured interviews. Criteria for defining states of diabetes included time since diagnosis of diabetes, the timing and nature of anti-hyperglycaemic medication regimens, and the timing and number of complications. 

Results. Duration of diabetes closely corresponded to a set of typical states based on the criteria. Using analysis of covariance to control for confounding factors, diabetes-related distress and psychological well-being were significantly (p < 0.05) worse for persons with diabetes with more complications and more intense medication regimens. Longer duration of insulin use was significantly associated with more diabetes-related distress. Worse distress and well-being were significantly associated with the accumulation of complications over time, but were more strongly associated with recently diagnosed complications than with more distally diagnosed complications. 

Conclusions. Well-being and distress varied over sta- tes as defined by the nature and timing of diagnoses and medications. The observed patterns were more complex than a linear model of disease staging would suggest. 

Abstract

Purpose. To examine well-being and diabetes-related distress across several common states differentiated in the course of type 2 diabetes.

Material and methods. Random samples of adults with type 2 diabetes were obtained from multiple co- untries in the first DAWN (Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes, and Needs) Study (n = 3432). All data were obtained during structured interviews. Criteria for defining states of diabetes included time since diagnosis of diabetes, the timing and nature of anti-hyperglycaemic medication regimens, and the timing and number of complications. 

Results. Duration of diabetes closely corresponded to a set of typical states based on the criteria. Using analysis of covariance to control for confounding factors, diabetes-related distress and psychological well-being were significantly (p < 0.05) worse for persons with diabetes with more complications and more intense medication regimens. Longer duration of insulin use was significantly associated with more diabetes-related distress. Worse distress and well-being were significantly associated with the accumulation of complications over time, but were more strongly associated with recently diagnosed complications than with more distally diagnosed complications. 

Conclusions. Well-being and distress varied over sta- tes as defined by the nature and timing of diagnoses and medications. The observed patterns were more complex than a linear model of disease staging would suggest. 

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Keywords

psychological well-being; diabetes; type 2 diabetes; diseases states; diagnosis; complications; treatment regimen

About this article
Title

Psychological well-being and diabetes-related distress in states of type 2 diabetes in the first multi-national Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) Study

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 8, No 3 (2019)

Pages

167-175

Published online

2019-06-19

DOI

10.5603/DK.2019.0012

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2019;8(3):167-175.

Keywords

psychological well-being
diabetes
type 2 diabetes
diseases states
diagnosis
complications
treatment regimen

Authors

Mark Peyrot
Soren E Skovlund
Rafał Radzio
Andrzej Kokoszka

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