open access

Vol 7, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-09-11
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Overexpression of miR-652-5p in new onset type 1 diabetes

Magdalena Zurawek, Agnieszka Dzikiewicz-Krawczyk, Katarzyna Izykowska, Iwona Ziolkowska-Suchanek, Bogda Skowronska, Maria Czainska, Marta Kazimierska, Marta Podralska, Piotr Fichna, Grzegorz Krzysztof Przybylski, Jerzy Nowak, Marta Fichna, Natalia Rozwadowska
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2018.0019
·
Clinical Diabetology 2018;7(4):189-195.

open access

Vol 7, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-09-11

Abstract

Introduction. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. miRNAs have emerged as an important regulators of central and peripheral immune tolerance, therefore study the RNA molecules in the context of type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis is an important issue. The aim of this study was to investigate miR-652-5p expression level in the new onset T1D and an impact on ADAR and MARCH5, potential target genes. Material and methods. The miR-652-5p expression was investigated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell of newly diagnosed T1D pediatric patients (n = 28) and age-matched controls (n = 28) by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). miRNA targets were analyzed by luciferase reporter assays. Results. Expression analysis revealed upregulation of miR-652-5p in T1D group compared to non-diabetic controls (p < 0.05). Luciferase reporter assay did not indicated ADAR and MARCH5 as miR-652-5p targets. Conclusion. Our study revealed miR-652-5p as potential marker of new onset type 1 diabetes.

Abstract

Introduction. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. miRNAs have emerged as an important regulators of central and peripheral immune tolerance, therefore study the RNA molecules in the context of type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis is an important issue. The aim of this study was to investigate miR-652-5p expression level in the new onset T1D and an impact on ADAR and MARCH5, potential target genes. Material and methods. The miR-652-5p expression was investigated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell of newly diagnosed T1D pediatric patients (n = 28) and age-matched controls (n = 28) by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). miRNA targets were analyzed by luciferase reporter assays. Results. Expression analysis revealed upregulation of miR-652-5p in T1D group compared to non-diabetic controls (p < 0.05). Luciferase reporter assay did not indicated ADAR and MARCH5 as miR-652-5p targets. Conclusion. Our study revealed miR-652-5p as potential marker of new onset type 1 diabetes.
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Keywords

T1D; expression; miR-652-5p; ADAR; MARCH5

About this article
Title

Overexpression of miR-652-5p in new onset type 1 diabetes

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 7, No 4 (2018)

Pages

189-195

Published online

2018-09-11

DOI

10.5603/DK.2018.0019

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2018;7(4):189-195.

Keywords

T1D
expression
miR-652-5p
ADAR
MARCH5

Authors

Magdalena Zurawek
Agnieszka Dzikiewicz-Krawczyk
Katarzyna Izykowska
Iwona Ziolkowska-Suchanek
Bogda Skowronska
Maria Czainska
Marta Kazimierska
Marta Podralska
Piotr Fichna
Grzegorz Krzysztof Przybylski
Jerzy Nowak
Marta Fichna
Natalia Rozwadowska

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