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Vol 7, No 5 (2018)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-11-27
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Insulin resistance and adaptation of pancreatic beta cells during pregnancy

Anna Zielińska-Maciulewska, Adam Krętowski, Małgorzata Szelachowska
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2018.0022
·
Clinical Diabetology 2018;7(5):222-229.

open access

Vol 7, No 5 (2018)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-11-27

Abstract

Insulin resistance is described as reduced sensitivity of the body tissues to insulin. In pregnant women insulin resistance increases during each trimester of pregnancy due to the hormones produced by the placenta and many other factors which are not yet fully recognised. Growing insulin resistance leads to an increase in beta cell mass and number and insulin secretion, which helps to maintain glucose homeostasis and normal foetal development. However, in cases of severe insulin resistance, insufficient compensation of pancreatic beta cells or reduced pancreatic beta-cell function, glycaemic levels are increased and gestational diabetes mellitus develops. The aim of the present review is to analyse the factors affecting insulin resistance and the adaptation of pancreatic beta cells during pregnancy and methods of insulin resistance assessment.

Abstract

Insulin resistance is described as reduced sensitivity of the body tissues to insulin. In pregnant women insulin resistance increases during each trimester of pregnancy due to the hormones produced by the placenta and many other factors which are not yet fully recognised. Growing insulin resistance leads to an increase in beta cell mass and number and insulin secretion, which helps to maintain glucose homeostasis and normal foetal development. However, in cases of severe insulin resistance, insufficient compensation of pancreatic beta cells or reduced pancreatic beta-cell function, glycaemic levels are increased and gestational diabetes mellitus develops. The aim of the present review is to analyse the factors affecting insulin resistance and the adaptation of pancreatic beta cells during pregnancy and methods of insulin resistance assessment.
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Keywords

insulin resistance; pregnancy; adipokines; gestational diabetes mellitus; adaptation of pancreatic beta cells in pregnancy

About this article
Title

Insulin resistance and adaptation of pancreatic beta cells during pregnancy

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 7, No 5 (2018)

Pages

222-229

Published online

2018-11-27

DOI

10.5603/DK.2018.0022

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2018;7(5):222-229.

Keywords

insulin resistance
pregnancy
adipokines
gestational diabetes mellitus
adaptation of pancreatic beta cells in pregnancy

Authors

Anna Zielińska-Maciulewska
Adam Krętowski
Małgorzata Szelachowska

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