open access

Vol 7, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-04-04
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Impact of physical activity on hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes

Katarzyna Zielińska, Dagmara Bysiak-Korus, Agnieszka Sosna-Kondera, Ewa Banaś, Joanna Bosowska, Krzysztof Strojek
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2018.0005
·
Clinical Diabetology 2018;7(2):108-113.

open access

Vol 7, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-04-04

Abstract

Aim. Assessment of the effect of the physical activity level in diabetic patients on the occurrence of hypo­glycaemia.

Material and methods. The survey was conducted in a group of 422 diabetic patients: 209 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (129 women, 80 men, mean age 30 ± 11 years, mean duration of diabetes 12 ± 8 years, HbA1c: 7.5 ± 1.4%) and 213 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (119 women, 94 men, mean age 60 ± 12 years, mean duration of diabetes 10 ± 9 years, HbA1c: 8 ± 1.5%). Patients filled in the questionnaire covering data on diabetes control and physical activity (based on the International Physical Activity Question­naire — IPAQ).

Results. Overall the number of patients with hypogly­caemia was significantly higher in patients with high physical activity (65%) when compared to low activity (43%; p < 0.01). Patients with moderate activity did not differ from remaining groups. In type 1 diabetes mellitus number of episodes was significantly lower in low activity group (4%) when compared to high activity (61%; p < 0.001) and moderate activity (17%; p < 0.001). Also significant difference was found be­tween high and moderate activity (p < 0.001). In type 2 diabetes mellitus the relation was similar. 23% patients with hypoglycaemia in high activity; 11% in modera­te activity (p < 0.005) and 5% in low activity group (p < 0.001 vs. high and moderate activity respectively).

Conclusions. The incidence of hypoglycaemia increases along with increasing physical activity. This indicates the necessity of an increased education in patients planning physical activity. (Clin Diabetol 2018; 7, 2: 108–113)  

Abstract

Aim. Assessment of the effect of the physical activity level in diabetic patients on the occurrence of hypo­glycaemia.

Material and methods. The survey was conducted in a group of 422 diabetic patients: 209 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (129 women, 80 men, mean age 30 ± 11 years, mean duration of diabetes 12 ± 8 years, HbA1c: 7.5 ± 1.4%) and 213 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (119 women, 94 men, mean age 60 ± 12 years, mean duration of diabetes 10 ± 9 years, HbA1c: 8 ± 1.5%). Patients filled in the questionnaire covering data on diabetes control and physical activity (based on the International Physical Activity Question­naire — IPAQ).

Results. Overall the number of patients with hypogly­caemia was significantly higher in patients with high physical activity (65%) when compared to low activity (43%; p < 0.01). Patients with moderate activity did not differ from remaining groups. In type 1 diabetes mellitus number of episodes was significantly lower in low activity group (4%) when compared to high activity (61%; p < 0.001) and moderate activity (17%; p < 0.001). Also significant difference was found be­tween high and moderate activity (p < 0.001). In type 2 diabetes mellitus the relation was similar. 23% patients with hypoglycaemia in high activity; 11% in modera­te activity (p < 0.005) and 5% in low activity group (p < 0.001 vs. high and moderate activity respectively).

Conclusions. The incidence of hypoglycaemia increases along with increasing physical activity. This indicates the necessity of an increased education in patients planning physical activity. (Clin Diabetol 2018; 7, 2: 108–113)  

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Keywords

diabetes, hypoglycaemia, physical activity

About this article
Title

Impact of physical activity on hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 7, No 2 (2018)

Pages

108-113

Published online

2018-04-04

DOI

10.5603/DK.2018.0005

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2018;7(2):108-113.

Keywords

diabetes
hypoglycaemia
physical activity

Authors

Katarzyna Zielińska
Dagmara Bysiak-Korus
Agnieszka Sosna-Kondera
Ewa Banaś
Joanna Bosowska
Krzysztof Strojek

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