open access

Vol 24, No 1-2 (2022)
Case report
Published online: 2022-08-05
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An uncommon cause of well-known symptoms: acute abdomen in a 2-year-old boy with intestinal malrotation. Case report and literature review

Patrycja Sosnowska-Sienkiewicz1, Maria Mitkowska2, Jakub Langa2, Przemysław Mańkowski1
·
Chirurgia Polska 2022;24(1-2):22-25.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Paediatric Surgery, Traumatology and Urology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  2. Student Research Group: Pediatric Surgery; Department of Pediatric Surgery, Traumatology and Urology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland

open access

Vol 24, No 1-2 (2022)
Case reports
Published online: 2022-08-05

Abstract

Midgut malrotation is the most frequent congenital defect of the small intestine. The clinical manifestation can vary from being asymptomatic to presenting acutely as volvulus with bilious vomiting.

Presented here is a case of a 32-months-old boy with abdominal pain and several emetic episodes before admission. The patient was diagnosed with ileus and needed emergency surgery which showed the presence of volvulus due to malrotation of the midgut. Extensive partial resections of the jejunum, ileum and colon beginning in the upper part of the rectum up to ascending colon were performed.

Intestinal malrotation is rarely a symptomatic abnormality, however, when it occurs severely it can result in life-threatening complications. Ultrasonography may be a helpful screening tool for early diagnosis, but it needs the experience of the doctor. Treating significant malrotation almost always requires surgery. The timing and urgency depend on the child’s condition.

Abstract

Midgut malrotation is the most frequent congenital defect of the small intestine. The clinical manifestation can vary from being asymptomatic to presenting acutely as volvulus with bilious vomiting.

Presented here is a case of a 32-months-old boy with abdominal pain and several emetic episodes before admission. The patient was diagnosed with ileus and needed emergency surgery which showed the presence of volvulus due to malrotation of the midgut. Extensive partial resections of the jejunum, ileum and colon beginning in the upper part of the rectum up to ascending colon were performed.

Intestinal malrotation is rarely a symptomatic abnormality, however, when it occurs severely it can result in life-threatening complications. Ultrasonography may be a helpful screening tool for early diagnosis, but it needs the experience of the doctor. Treating significant malrotation almost always requires surgery. The timing and urgency depend on the child’s condition.

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Keywords

acute abdomen; child; congenital abnormality; intestinal malrotation; volvulus

About this article
Title

An uncommon cause of well-known symptoms: acute abdomen in a 2-year-old boy with intestinal malrotation. Case report and literature review

Journal

Chirurgia Polska (Polish Surgery)

Issue

Vol 24, No 1-2 (2022)

Article type

Case report

Pages

22-25

Published online

2022-08-05

Page views

966

Article views/downloads

119

DOI

10.5603/ChP.2021.0004

Bibliographic record

Chirurgia Polska 2022;24(1-2):22-25.

Keywords

acute abdomen
child
congenital abnormality
intestinal malrotation
volvulus

Authors

Patrycja Sosnowska-Sienkiewicz
Maria Mitkowska
Jakub Langa
Przemysław Mańkowski

References (23)
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