Vol 21, No 1-2 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2021-03-04
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Does the smoking-related mortality and morbidity awareness influence on the prevalence of active smoking among medical students?

Katarzyna Kościelna, Ewa Mędoń, Michał Widuch, Wacław Kuczmik
Chirurgia Polska 2019;21(1-2):15-19.

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Vol 21, No 1-2 (2019)
Original articles
Published online: 2021-03-04

Abstract

Introduction: Smoking is one of the main risk factors for developing circulatory and pulmonary system diseases. Nicotinism is also a basis for the development of such diseases as atherosclerosis, cancer, asthma, arterial hypertension. Not only being an active smoker affects health, but also passive smoke inhalation does. Despite the commonly available knowledge regarding the smoking consequences, there is still the number of active smokers also among the healthcare providers.

Materials and methods: The research was performed on the base of the specially prepared anonymous questionnaire and conducted among the medical students. Answers were taken account of 234 third-year medical students from the Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. The following information was evaluated: the fact of active smoking, previous attempts to give up smoking, motivation to give up smoking, family risk factors, the most common situations which provoke smoking.

Results: Among the 3rd year medical students, about 47% consider being an active smoker. Among them, 67% is cigarette addict and 33% is an occasional smoker. According to answers, the most common occasions to smoke are respectively: stress-related with exams, meeting and parties with friends, family problems. The major part of smokers are males (74%). Cigarettes type preferences were different in both sexes, so were kinds of smoked substances.

Conclusions: Despite the acknowledgement of threat to health, especially in the medical environment, a still big percentage of young people remained active smokers. It seems to emphasize the necessity of making students aware of smoking negative effect on their health.

Abstract

Introduction: Smoking is one of the main risk factors for developing circulatory and pulmonary system diseases. Nicotinism is also a basis for the development of such diseases as atherosclerosis, cancer, asthma, arterial hypertension. Not only being an active smoker affects health, but also passive smoke inhalation does. Despite the commonly available knowledge regarding the smoking consequences, there is still the number of active smokers also among the healthcare providers.

Materials and methods: The research was performed on the base of the specially prepared anonymous questionnaire and conducted among the medical students. Answers were taken account of 234 third-year medical students from the Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. The following information was evaluated: the fact of active smoking, previous attempts to give up smoking, motivation to give up smoking, family risk factors, the most common situations which provoke smoking.

Results: Among the 3rd year medical students, about 47% consider being an active smoker. Among them, 67% is cigarette addict and 33% is an occasional smoker. According to answers, the most common occasions to smoke are respectively: stress-related with exams, meeting and parties with friends, family problems. The major part of smokers are males (74%). Cigarettes type preferences were different in both sexes, so were kinds of smoked substances.

Conclusions: Despite the acknowledgement of threat to health, especially in the medical environment, a still big percentage of young people remained active smokers. It seems to emphasize the necessity of making students aware of smoking negative effect on their health.

Get Citation

Keywords

smoking; health care providers; medical environment; smoking-related morbidity

About this article
Title

Does the smoking-related mortality and morbidity awareness influence on the prevalence of active smoking among medical students?

Journal

Chirurgia Polska (Polish Surgery)

Issue

Vol 21, No 1-2 (2019)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

15-19

Published online

2021-03-04

Bibliographic record

Chirurgia Polska 2019;21(1-2):15-19.

Keywords

smoking
health care providers
medical environment
smoking-related morbidity

Authors

Katarzyna Kościelna
Ewa Mędoń
Michał Widuch
Wacław Kuczmik

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