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Vol 19, No 1-2 (2017)
Original articles
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Assessment of cotinine levels and selected inflammatory markers in patients after carotid endarterectomy

Elżbieta Świętochowska, Paweł Kiczmer, Alicja Prawdzic-Seńkowska, Daria Wziątek-Kuczmik, Zofia Ostrowska, Marek Motyka
Chirurgia Polska 2017;19(1-2):1-6.

open access

Vol 19, No 1-2 (2017)
Original articles

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading mortality cause in western society. The main role in CVD development is played by atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a long and complex process, in which are involved both lipid and immune system components, as well as environmental factors such as tobacco smoking. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of tobacco smoke exposure on parameters (lipoproteins, TGF-β1, MPO) associated with pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy as a result of carotid artery stenosis. The study included 92 patients at the age of 47-82. Tobacco exposure was assessed according to cotinine blood level. No differences in the level of stenosis and concentration in serum of LDL, HDL, triglicerydes, Lp(a) and total cholesterol were observed between the smokers and non-smokers. TGF-β1 concentration was higher in non-smoking patients. Among smokers, cotinine level was correlated with MPO concentration
(p < 0,05). To conclude, tobacco smoking stimulates the inflammatory process and smooth muscle proliferation in the wall of carotid artery leading to atherogenesis.

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading mortality cause in western society. The main role in CVD development is played by atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a long and complex process, in which are involved both lipid and immune system components, as well as environmental factors such as tobacco smoking. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of tobacco smoke exposure on parameters (lipoproteins, TGF-β1, MPO) associated with pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy as a result of carotid artery stenosis. The study included 92 patients at the age of 47-82. Tobacco exposure was assessed according to cotinine blood level. No differences in the level of stenosis and concentration in serum of LDL, HDL, triglicerydes, Lp(a) and total cholesterol were observed between the smokers and non-smokers. TGF-β1 concentration was higher in non-smoking patients. Among smokers, cotinine level was correlated with MPO concentration
(p < 0,05). To conclude, tobacco smoking stimulates the inflammatory process and smooth muscle proliferation in the wall of carotid artery leading to atherogenesis.

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Keywords

Endarterectomy, TGF-β1, nicotine abuse

About this article
Title

Assessment of cotinine levels and selected inflammatory markers in patients after carotid endarterectomy

Journal

Chirurgia Polska (Polish Surgery)

Issue

Vol 19, No 1-2 (2017)

Pages

1-6

Bibliographic record

Chirurgia Polska 2017;19(1-2):1-6.

Keywords

Endarterectomy
TGF-β1
nicotine abuse

Authors

Elżbieta Świętochowska
Paweł Kiczmer
Alicja Prawdzic-Seńkowska
Daria Wziątek-Kuczmik
Zofia Ostrowska
Marek Motyka

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