open access

Vol 4, No 3 (2002)
Published online: 2002-11-08
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Diet-induced hypercholesterolaemia causes increase of red blood cell deformability in rabbits

Bogdan Chmiel, Rozalia Grabowska-Bochenek, Danuta Piskorska, Lech Cierpka
Chirurgia Polska 2002;4(3):107-112.

open access

Vol 4, No 3 (2002)
Published online: 2002-11-08

Abstract

Introduction: The associations between atherosclerosis, hyperlipidaemia, microcirculatory disturbances and decreased red blood cell (RBC) deformability are well established. However, a reduction of hypercholesterolaemia may not always lead to improvement of red blood cell deformability, hence the aim of this study was to measure RBC deformability in well-controlled experimental conditions.
Material and methods: Rabbits were fed normal diet n = 5 (control), or hen’s egg enriched diet n = 5 (hypercholesterolaemia). After six weeks RBC deformability was measured by shear stress diffractometer Rheodyn SSD.
Results: There were significant increases in RBC deformability in hypercholesterolaemic v. control rabbits at higher shear stresses between 6.0 and 60.0 Pa, decreases in mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), increases in mean corpuscular volume of erythrocyte (MCV), increases in superoxide dismutase activity, and increases in Vitamin A and E levels in the serum.
Conclusions: 1. Deformability of RBC of hypercholesterolaemic rabbits has been increased. 2. Possible factors responsible for the increase in deformability of erythrocytes during experimental hypercholesterolaemia can be changes in mean corpuscular volume, erythrocyte’s cytoplasma viscosity and oxidative-antioxidative balance.

Abstract

Introduction: The associations between atherosclerosis, hyperlipidaemia, microcirculatory disturbances and decreased red blood cell (RBC) deformability are well established. However, a reduction of hypercholesterolaemia may not always lead to improvement of red blood cell deformability, hence the aim of this study was to measure RBC deformability in well-controlled experimental conditions.
Material and methods: Rabbits were fed normal diet n = 5 (control), or hen’s egg enriched diet n = 5 (hypercholesterolaemia). After six weeks RBC deformability was measured by shear stress diffractometer Rheodyn SSD.
Results: There were significant increases in RBC deformability in hypercholesterolaemic v. control rabbits at higher shear stresses between 6.0 and 60.0 Pa, decreases in mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), increases in mean corpuscular volume of erythrocyte (MCV), increases in superoxide dismutase activity, and increases in Vitamin A and E levels in the serum.
Conclusions: 1. Deformability of RBC of hypercholesterolaemic rabbits has been increased. 2. Possible factors responsible for the increase in deformability of erythrocytes during experimental hypercholesterolaemia can be changes in mean corpuscular volume, erythrocyte’s cytoplasma viscosity and oxidative-antioxidative balance.
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Keywords

erythrocytes deformability; hypercholesterolaemia

About this article
Title

Diet-induced hypercholesterolaemia causes increase of red blood cell deformability in rabbits

Journal

Chirurgia Polska (Polish Surgery)

Issue

Vol 4, No 3 (2002)

Pages

107-112

Published online

2002-11-08

Bibliographic record

Chirurgia Polska 2002;4(3):107-112.

Keywords

erythrocytes deformability
hypercholesterolaemia

Authors

Bogdan Chmiel
Rozalia Grabowska-Bochenek
Danuta Piskorska
Lech Cierpka

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