open access

Vol 8, No 2 (2006)
Published online: 2006-04-12
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Long-term results of primary inguinal hernia repair according to the Lichtenstein, Trabucco T4 and Valenti methods

Andrzej Opertowski, Piotr Remesz, Stanisław Dąbrowiecki
Chirurgia Polska 2006;8(2):125-135.

open access

Vol 8, No 2 (2006)
Published online: 2006-04-12

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was a long-term observation of primary inguinal hernia surgery treatment results.
Material and methods: An analysis of the treatment outcomes of 152 patients (142 M/10 F; 19–84 yrs, median 60) operated on for primary inguinal hernia at the SPZOZ Garwolin Hospital Surgery Ward between June 1999 and June 2001 was performed. The hernias were predominantly type II, III and IV (n = 78, 43, 27 resp.) according to the Gilbert-Rutkow classification. Elective (95%) and emergency repairs (in cases of incarceration) were performed according to the Lichtenstein (n = 78), Trabucco T4 (n = 36) and Valenti (n = 38) methods. Polypropylene multifiber Dallop PP mesh implants were used. The postoperative hospitalization ranged from 1–14 days, with a median of 3 days.
Results: The prospective follow-up lasted 13–35 months (median 24 months). Late complications were rare and included: hypertrophic scar, testicular abnormality (n = 8), spermatic cord abnormality (n = 4) and pain or paresthesias within the operated region (n = 12).
Conclusion: Even though two recurrences were observed following surgery employing Lichtenstein’s method, there was no statistical difference between the operative techniques used as to the number of complications and unfavorable treatment outcomes.

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was a long-term observation of primary inguinal hernia surgery treatment results.
Material and methods: An analysis of the treatment outcomes of 152 patients (142 M/10 F; 19–84 yrs, median 60) operated on for primary inguinal hernia at the SPZOZ Garwolin Hospital Surgery Ward between June 1999 and June 2001 was performed. The hernias were predominantly type II, III and IV (n = 78, 43, 27 resp.) according to the Gilbert-Rutkow classification. Elective (95%) and emergency repairs (in cases of incarceration) were performed according to the Lichtenstein (n = 78), Trabucco T4 (n = 36) and Valenti (n = 38) methods. Polypropylene multifiber Dallop PP mesh implants were used. The postoperative hospitalization ranged from 1–14 days, with a median of 3 days.
Results: The prospective follow-up lasted 13–35 months (median 24 months). Late complications were rare and included: hypertrophic scar, testicular abnormality (n = 8), spermatic cord abnormality (n = 4) and pain or paresthesias within the operated region (n = 12).
Conclusion: Even though two recurrences were observed following surgery employing Lichtenstein’s method, there was no statistical difference between the operative techniques used as to the number of complications and unfavorable treatment outcomes.
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Keywords

inguinal hernia; tension-free technique; remote results

About this article
Title

Long-term results of primary inguinal hernia repair according to the Lichtenstein, Trabucco T4 and Valenti methods

Journal

Chirurgia Polska (Polish Surgery)

Issue

Vol 8, No 2 (2006)

Pages

125-135

Published online

2006-04-12

Bibliographic record

Chirurgia Polska 2006;8(2):125-135.

Keywords

inguinal hernia
tension-free technique
remote results

Authors

Andrzej Opertowski
Piotr Remesz
Stanisław Dąbrowiecki

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