open access

Vol 11, No 2 (2009)
Published online: 2010-03-24
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Evaluation of the common bile duct width in ultrasonography and of BMI changes as prognostic factors of ailment recurrence after endoscopy in choledocholithiasis - preliminary report

Piotr Piekorz, Maciej Zaniewski, Dawid Hadasik, Eugeniusz Majewski, Jacek Kostecki, Urszula Skotnicka-Graca
Chirurgia Polska 2009;11(2):45-50.

open access

Vol 11, No 2 (2009)
Published online: 2010-03-24

Abstract

Background: Endoscopy is the “gold standard” in choledocholithiasis treatment. Despite its proven effectiveness, ailment recurrence requiring another endoscopic intervention is observed in about 4–24% of patients.
Material and methods: In 2008-2009, in Department of Surgery of District Specialist Hospital No. 1 in Tychy, an ultrasonographic check-up of changes in common bile duct width and of changes in BMI after endoscopic treatment was performed in 30 patients with mechanical jaundice resulting from choledocholithiasis.
Results: In patients requiring another endoscopic intervention, it was observed that an average decrease in the width of the common bile duct within 24 hours after endoscopic treatment was about 50% lower than in other patients. Moreover, in patients after an urgent cholecystectomy or another endoscopy, a noticeable decrease in BMI was observed in the period of 1.5–3 months.
Conclusions: The above-mentioned observations confirm the significance of ultrasonography as a sensitive indicator of residual or recurrent choledocholithiasis. The evaluation of changes in BMI after an endoscopy can become a long-term indicator of bile duct dysfunction.

Abstract

Background: Endoscopy is the “gold standard” in choledocholithiasis treatment. Despite its proven effectiveness, ailment recurrence requiring another endoscopic intervention is observed in about 4–24% of patients.
Material and methods: In 2008-2009, in Department of Surgery of District Specialist Hospital No. 1 in Tychy, an ultrasonographic check-up of changes in common bile duct width and of changes in BMI after endoscopic treatment was performed in 30 patients with mechanical jaundice resulting from choledocholithiasis.
Results: In patients requiring another endoscopic intervention, it was observed that an average decrease in the width of the common bile duct within 24 hours after endoscopic treatment was about 50% lower than in other patients. Moreover, in patients after an urgent cholecystectomy or another endoscopy, a noticeable decrease in BMI was observed in the period of 1.5–3 months.
Conclusions: The above-mentioned observations confirm the significance of ultrasonography as a sensitive indicator of residual or recurrent choledocholithiasis. The evaluation of changes in BMI after an endoscopy can become a long-term indicator of bile duct dysfunction.
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Keywords

common bile duct; endoscopic sphincterotomy; changes in BMI

About this article
Title

Evaluation of the common bile duct width in ultrasonography and of BMI changes as prognostic factors of ailment recurrence after endoscopy in choledocholithiasis - preliminary report

Journal

Chirurgia Polska (Polish Surgery)

Issue

Vol 11, No 2 (2009)

Pages

45-50

Published online

2010-03-24

Bibliographic record

Chirurgia Polska 2009;11(2):45-50.

Keywords

common bile duct
endoscopic sphincterotomy
changes in BMI

Authors

Piotr Piekorz
Maciej Zaniewski
Dawid Hadasik
Eugeniusz Majewski
Jacek Kostecki
Urszula Skotnicka-Graca

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