open access

Vol 13, No 2 (2011)
Published online: 2012-04-27
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Recanalization of lower limb artery chronic total occlusion using a Crosser device — our own experience

Bogusław Rudel, Wacław Kuczmik
Chirurgia Polska 2011;13(2):112-117.

open access

Vol 13, No 2 (2011)
Published online: 2012-04-27

Abstract

Background: Endovascular treatment of lower limb artery chronic total occlusion (CTO) is still a great challenge. Although the subintimal method is used predominantly in order to pass through the occluded segment of an artery, this sometimes fails. Moreover, debate whether the intraluminal method gives far better results is still ongoing. The aim of the study was to examine the efficacy of the CTO Crosser catheter which is a new device recommended for intraluminal recanalization of total chronic occlusion lesions.
Material and method: 10 cases of using a CTO Crosser device in recanalizing lower limb artery lesions were assessed. Of these, 7 cases of occlusions were localized in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), 1 case in the SFA and popliteal artery (PA), 1 case in the PA and tibio-peroneal trunk (TPT) and the final case in the common iliac artery (CIA). The reason for the patient’s treatment was always critical limb ischemia.
Results: Although in all cases the catheter was successfully passed through the CTO lesions, in one case it partially passed through the subintimal space. Moreover, no serious complications, perforations and hematomas were observed.
Conclusion: A CTO Crosser is a safe and effective device for the recanalization of CTO lesions in lower limb arteries.

Abstract

Background: Endovascular treatment of lower limb artery chronic total occlusion (CTO) is still a great challenge. Although the subintimal method is used predominantly in order to pass through the occluded segment of an artery, this sometimes fails. Moreover, debate whether the intraluminal method gives far better results is still ongoing. The aim of the study was to examine the efficacy of the CTO Crosser catheter which is a new device recommended for intraluminal recanalization of total chronic occlusion lesions.
Material and method: 10 cases of using a CTO Crosser device in recanalizing lower limb artery lesions were assessed. Of these, 7 cases of occlusions were localized in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), 1 case in the SFA and popliteal artery (PA), 1 case in the PA and tibio-peroneal trunk (TPT) and the final case in the common iliac artery (CIA). The reason for the patient’s treatment was always critical limb ischemia.
Results: Although in all cases the catheter was successfully passed through the CTO lesions, in one case it partially passed through the subintimal space. Moreover, no serious complications, perforations and hematomas were observed.
Conclusion: A CTO Crosser is a safe and effective device for the recanalization of CTO lesions in lower limb arteries.
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Keywords

chronic total occlusion (CTO); superficial femoral artery (SFA); crosser; angioplasty

About this article
Title

Recanalization of lower limb artery chronic total occlusion using a Crosser device — our own experience

Journal

Chirurgia Polska (Polish Surgery)

Issue

Vol 13, No 2 (2011)

Pages

112-117

Published online

2012-04-27

Bibliographic record

Chirurgia Polska 2011;13(2):112-117.

Keywords

chronic total occlusion (CTO)
superficial femoral artery (SFA)
crosser
angioplasty

Authors

Bogusław Rudel
Wacław Kuczmik

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