open access

Vol 27, No 3 (2023)
Case report
Published online: 2023-06-26
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A nonspecific clinical picture and the course of Conn syndrome — current findings in the screening program for hypertensive patients

Jakub Orczyk1, Aleksandra Ołownia1, Jakub Krzysztof Gałązka1, Agnieszka Polak2, Beata Matyjaszek-Matuszek2
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Arterial Hypertension 2023;27(3):189-192.
Affiliations
  1. Students’ Scientific Association at Department and Clinic of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolic Diseases, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland
  2. Department and Clinic of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolic Diseases, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland

open access

Vol 27, No 3 (2023)
CASE REPORT
Published online: 2023-06-26

Abstract

Conn syndrome (CS), next to bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, is one of the most common causes of primary hyperaldosteronism. It leads to potentially curable secondary hypertension.

The 54-year-old woman underwent an abdominal computed tomography (CT) examination for symptomatic nephrolithiasis. A focal lesion of the left adrenal gland was found with a diameter of 16 mm and a density of 34 Hounsfield units (HU). The lesion was under observation, and the next magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showed a slight enlargement of the lesion to a size of 18 x 12 mm. The lesion was interpreted as an atypical adenoma of the adrenal gland. According to the course, the patient was referred to the endocrinology clinic. The patient's symptoms included hypertension and paresthesia. During two separate hospitalizations, Conn syndrome was diagnosed using a specific laboratory test. The patient was successfully treated by surgical intervention, resulting in remission of all symptoms.

This case illustrates the difficulties in diagnosing primary hyperaldosteronism. The symptoms of Conn syndrome may vary in severity or may be absent. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can save many ill individuals from cardiovascular, metabolic, or renal complications. The case underscores the need for screening hypertensive patients using the aldosterone-renin ratio (ARR).

Abstract

Conn syndrome (CS), next to bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, is one of the most common causes of primary hyperaldosteronism. It leads to potentially curable secondary hypertension.

The 54-year-old woman underwent an abdominal computed tomography (CT) examination for symptomatic nephrolithiasis. A focal lesion of the left adrenal gland was found with a diameter of 16 mm and a density of 34 Hounsfield units (HU). The lesion was under observation, and the next magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showed a slight enlargement of the lesion to a size of 18 x 12 mm. The lesion was interpreted as an atypical adenoma of the adrenal gland. According to the course, the patient was referred to the endocrinology clinic. The patient's symptoms included hypertension and paresthesia. During two separate hospitalizations, Conn syndrome was diagnosed using a specific laboratory test. The patient was successfully treated by surgical intervention, resulting in remission of all symptoms.

This case illustrates the difficulties in diagnosing primary hyperaldosteronism. The symptoms of Conn syndrome may vary in severity or may be absent. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can save many ill individuals from cardiovascular, metabolic, or renal complications. The case underscores the need for screening hypertensive patients using the aldosterone-renin ratio (ARR).

Get Citation

Keywords

Conn syndrome; adrenalectomy; primary hyperaldosteronism; aldosterone, till-table test

About this article
Title

A nonspecific clinical picture and the course of Conn syndrome — current findings in the screening program for hypertensive patients

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 27, No 3 (2023)

Article type

Case report

Pages

189-192

Published online

2023-06-26

Page views

374

Article views/downloads

237

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2023.0015

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2023;27(3):189-192.

Keywords

Conn syndrome
adrenalectomy
primary hyperaldosteronism
aldosterone
till-table test

Authors

Jakub Orczyk
Aleksandra Ołownia
Jakub Krzysztof Gałązka
Agnieszka Polak
Beata Matyjaszek-Matuszek

References (16)
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