open access

Vol 27, No 1 (2023)
Original paper
Published online: 2023-02-09
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Hypertension phenotypes in rural part of East Indonesia: the TENSI pilot study

Aryandhito Widhi Nugroho1, Nur Upik En Masrika2
·
Arterial Hypertension 2023;27(1):36-45.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Khairun University, Gambesi, Ternate, Indonesia
  2. Department of Biomedics, Faculty of Medicine, Khairun University, Gambesi, Ternate, Gambesi, Indonesia

open access

Vol 27, No 1 (2023)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2023-02-09

Abstract

Background: Though extensively studied in other Asian countries, office and home blood pressure (BP)-based hypertension determination and phenotypes in rural population are still scarcely investigated in Indonesia. We aim to elaborate this in an East Indonesia rural area, by implementing two available BP thresholds.

Material and methods: The Ternate Sehat Indonesia (TENSI) pilot study obtained demographic, anthropometric, biochemistry, office and home BP data from 146 residents aged ≥ 18 years old living in Ternate Island from July–August 2022. Hypertension and its phenotypes were defined in accordance with the 2019 Indonesian Society of Hypertension (InaSH) and the 2017 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) BP guidelines. Office and home BP differences were analyzed within each participant’s characteristics.

Results: Mean mm Hg ± SD office and home (i) systolic BP were 121.8 ± 17.9 and 117.8 ± 14.8 mm Hg (p < 0.001), (ii) diastolic BP were 77.9 ± 12.1 and 74.7 ± 8.9 mm Hg (p < 0.001). Hypertension was evident in 26% (InaSH) and 34.2% (ACC/AHA) participants. Moreover, 17.4% (InaSH) and 24.8% (ACC/AHA) of those self-reported to not having hypertension were found to be hypertensives. The proportion of sustained, white-coat, and masked hypertension were 7.5%, 9.6%, 8.9% (InaSH), and 8.2%, 21.2%, 4.8% (ACC/AHA). Compared to office BP, home BP significantly differed throughout more characteristics.

Conclusions: Our study has ascertained the actual hypertension status and phenotypes within a rural East Indonesia environment. The revelation of stronger home BP ability to detect BP differences may promote its application within the population in the future. 

Abstract

Background: Though extensively studied in other Asian countries, office and home blood pressure (BP)-based hypertension determination and phenotypes in rural population are still scarcely investigated in Indonesia. We aim to elaborate this in an East Indonesia rural area, by implementing two available BP thresholds.

Material and methods: The Ternate Sehat Indonesia (TENSI) pilot study obtained demographic, anthropometric, biochemistry, office and home BP data from 146 residents aged ≥ 18 years old living in Ternate Island from July–August 2022. Hypertension and its phenotypes were defined in accordance with the 2019 Indonesian Society of Hypertension (InaSH) and the 2017 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) BP guidelines. Office and home BP differences were analyzed within each participant’s characteristics.

Results: Mean mm Hg ± SD office and home (i) systolic BP were 121.8 ± 17.9 and 117.8 ± 14.8 mm Hg (p < 0.001), (ii) diastolic BP were 77.9 ± 12.1 and 74.7 ± 8.9 mm Hg (p < 0.001). Hypertension was evident in 26% (InaSH) and 34.2% (ACC/AHA) participants. Moreover, 17.4% (InaSH) and 24.8% (ACC/AHA) of those self-reported to not having hypertension were found to be hypertensives. The proportion of sustained, white-coat, and masked hypertension were 7.5%, 9.6%, 8.9% (InaSH), and 8.2%, 21.2%, 4.8% (ACC/AHA). Compared to office BP, home BP significantly differed throughout more characteristics.

Conclusions: Our study has ascertained the actual hypertension status and phenotypes within a rural East Indonesia environment. The revelation of stronger home BP ability to detect BP differences may promote its application within the population in the future. 

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Keywords

blood pressure; office; home; hypertension; phenotypes

About this article
Title

Hypertension phenotypes in rural part of East Indonesia: the TENSI pilot study

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 27, No 1 (2023)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

36-45

Published online

2023-02-09

Page views

2346

Article views/downloads

363

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2023.0007

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2023;27(1):36-45.

Keywords

blood pressure
office
home
hypertension
phenotypes

Authors

Aryandhito Widhi Nugroho
Nur Upik En Masrika

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