open access

Ahead of print
Case report
Published online: 2023-01-24
Get Citation

Renal Resistive Index in Hypertensive Patients: One Centre Study

Hasyim Kasim1, Khadijah Khairunnisa Hasyim1, Andi Makbul Aman1, Dimas Bayu1, Nur Fitriani1
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2023.0003
Affiliations
  1. Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Hasanuddin University, Jl Perintis Kemerdekaan Km.10, Tamalanrea, 90245 Makassar, Indonesia

open access

Ahead of print
CASE REPORT
Published online: 2023-01-24

Abstract

Introduction: Hypertension is a leading cause of kidney dysfunction. Renal resistive index (RRI) was an index to evaluate arterial compliance and/or resistance, reflecting the reduction of kidney function and microalbuminuria. We investigated the relationship of RRI in hypertensive patients to detect kidney dysfunction early detection. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study at Wahidin Sudirohusodo hospital in Juni-November 2022. All hypertensive patient was evaluated for RRI. RRI was examined with intrarenal doppler ultrasound, and a cut-off ≥0.70 were used. Results: This study included 61 subjects. Thirty-five subjects were female, and 26 subjects were male. 90.2% of subjects were below 60 years. eGFR level was 90,29±25,19 in RRI <0,7 and 64,91±31,79 in RRI >0,7. Our study found there was a significant difference between anti-hypertensive treatment and eGFR level with the RRI group (P value <0.05). There was no significant difference in sex, age, proteinuria, and hypertension control status in both RRI groups. Conclusion: The renal resistive index is a useful marker for early renal dysfunction in hypertensive patients despite normal eGFR.

Abstract

Introduction: Hypertension is a leading cause of kidney dysfunction. Renal resistive index (RRI) was an index to evaluate arterial compliance and/or resistance, reflecting the reduction of kidney function and microalbuminuria. We investigated the relationship of RRI in hypertensive patients to detect kidney dysfunction early detection. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study at Wahidin Sudirohusodo hospital in Juni-November 2022. All hypertensive patient was evaluated for RRI. RRI was examined with intrarenal doppler ultrasound, and a cut-off ≥0.70 were used. Results: This study included 61 subjects. Thirty-five subjects were female, and 26 subjects were male. 90.2% of subjects were below 60 years. eGFR level was 90,29±25,19 in RRI <0,7 and 64,91±31,79 in RRI >0,7. Our study found there was a significant difference between anti-hypertensive treatment and eGFR level with the RRI group (P value <0.05). There was no significant difference in sex, age, proteinuria, and hypertension control status in both RRI groups. Conclusion: The renal resistive index is a useful marker for early renal dysfunction in hypertensive patients despite normal eGFR.

Get Citation

Keywords

hypertension; renal resistive index; eGFR level

About this article
Title

Renal Resistive Index in Hypertensive Patients: One Centre Study

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Case report

Published online

2023-01-24

Page views

7

Article views/downloads

5

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2023.0003

Keywords

hypertension
renal resistive index
eGFR level

Authors

Hasyim Kasim
Khadijah Khairunnisa Hasyim
Andi Makbul Aman
Dimas Bayu
Nur Fitriani

References (13)
  1. Viazzi F, Leoncini G, Derchi LE, et al. Ultrasound Doppler renal resistive index: a useful tool for the management of the hypertensive patient. J Hypertens. 2014; 32(1): 149–153.
  2. Andrikou I, Tsioufis C, Konstantinidis D, et al. Renal resistive index in hypertensive patients. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2018; 20(12): 1739–1744.
  3. Giustiniano E, Pugliese L, Calabrò L, et al. Renal Resistive Index: Not Only for Kidney Clinics. J Ultrasound Med. 2022; 41(4): 1027–1030.
  4. Viazzi F, Leoncini G, Derchi LE, et al. Ultrasound Doppler renal resistive index: a useful tool for the management of the hypertensive patient. J Hypertens. 2014; 32(1): 149–153.
  5. Lubas A, Kade G, Niemczyk S. Renal resistive index as a marker of vascular damage in cardiovascular diseases. Int Urol Nephrol. 2014; 46(2): 395–402.
  6. Afsar B, Elsurer R. Increased renal resistive index in type 2 diabetes: Clinical relevance, mechanisms and future directions. Diabetes Metab Syndr. 2017; 11(4): 291–296.
  7. Gaurav K, Yalavarthy U, Chamberlain N, et al. Correlation between Renal Resistive Index and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Patients with Hypertension. J Vasc Ultrasound. 2018; 32(2): 82–84.
  8. Hashimoto J, Ito S. Central pulse pressure and aortic stiffness determine renal hemodynamics: pathophysiological implication for microalbuminuria in hypertension. Hypertension. 2011; 58(5): 839–846.
  9. Shimizu Y, Itoh T, Hougaku H, et al. Clinical usefulness of duplex ultrasonography for the assessment of renal arteriosclerosis in essential hypertensive patients. Hypertens Res. 2001; 24(1): 13–17.
  10. Toledo C, Thomas G, Schold JD, et al. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease. Hypertension. 2015; 66(2): 382–388.
  11. Miyoshi K, Okura T, Tanino A, et al. Usefulness of the renal resistive index to predict an increase in urinary albumin excretion in patients with essential hypertension. J Hum Hypertens. 2017; 31(1): 66–69.
  12. Trovato GM, Martines GF, Trovato FM, et al. Renal resistive index and parathyroid hormone relationship with renal function in nondiabetic patients. Endocr Res. 2012; 37(2): 47–58.
  13. Zhang F, Liu H, Liu Di, et al. Effects of RAAS Inhibitors in Patients with Kidney Disease. Curr Hypertens Rep. 2017; 19(9): 72.

Regulations

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl