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Published online: 2023-01-11
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Influence of obesity on biological age in patients with arterial hypertension

Olena Kolesnikova1, Olga Zaprovalna1, Tetiana Bondar1, Anna Potapenko1
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2023.0001
Affiliations
  1. L.T. Mala Therapy National Institute of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv, 61039, Ukraine

open access

Ahead of print
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2023-01-11

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between metabolic disorders, overweight and obesity with markers of accelerated ageing in patients with hypertension.

Materials and methods: 116 patients (the age 35–65 years, women 62.3%) with stage 1–2 grade 1–2 hypertension and low/moderate cardiovascular risk (CVR) were included in the study. 34 patients (27.59%) were obese, 50 patients (43.1%) were overweight, 32 patients (29.31%) had normal weight. Anthropometric, clinical, biochemical and molecular genetic methods (relative telomere length (RTL-b), telomerase activity (TA) and 5-methylcytosine global methyl level (GML) in DNA of blood mononuclear cells were used. Epigenetic age was calculated using the DNAm PhenoAge epigenetic clock.

Results: The increase markers of carbohydrate metabolism [glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resista (HOMA-IR)], changes of lipid metabolism indicators [an increase in triglycerides (TG) and a decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL)] were revealed in the obese group, compared with the normal weight group (p < 0.05). We didn’t find differences in RTL-b in any groups (p > 0.05). But at the same time obese patients had higher GML and lower TA (p < 0.05). The accelerated ageing (by DNAm PhenoAge epigenetic clock) was association with higher visceral fat%, higher levels, TG, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, all parameters of carbohydrate metabolism (HbA1c, FPG, Insulin, HOMA-IR) and lower HDL-C (p < 0.05).

Conclusions. Pathological weight gain associated with  the progression of metabolic disorders and accelerated ageing in patients with hypertension and low/moderate cardiovascular risk.

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between metabolic disorders, overweight and obesity with markers of accelerated ageing in patients with hypertension.

Materials and methods: 116 patients (the age 35–65 years, women 62.3%) with stage 1–2 grade 1–2 hypertension and low/moderate cardiovascular risk (CVR) were included in the study. 34 patients (27.59%) were obese, 50 patients (43.1%) were overweight, 32 patients (29.31%) had normal weight. Anthropometric, clinical, biochemical and molecular genetic methods (relative telomere length (RTL-b), telomerase activity (TA) and 5-methylcytosine global methyl level (GML) in DNA of blood mononuclear cells were used. Epigenetic age was calculated using the DNAm PhenoAge epigenetic clock.

Results: The increase markers of carbohydrate metabolism [glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resista (HOMA-IR)], changes of lipid metabolism indicators [an increase in triglycerides (TG) and a decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL)] were revealed in the obese group, compared with the normal weight group (p < 0.05). We didn’t find differences in RTL-b in any groups (p > 0.05). But at the same time obese patients had higher GML and lower TA (p < 0.05). The accelerated ageing (by DNAm PhenoAge epigenetic clock) was association with higher visceral fat%, higher levels, TG, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, all parameters of carbohydrate metabolism (HbA1c, FPG, Insulin, HOMA-IR) and lower HDL-C (p < 0.05).

Conclusions. Pathological weight gain associated with  the progression of metabolic disorders and accelerated ageing in patients with hypertension and low/moderate cardiovascular risk.

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Keywords

overweight; obesity; arterial hypertension; epigenetic age; accelerated ageing

About this article
Title

Influence of obesity on biological age in patients with arterial hypertension

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original paper

Published online

2023-01-11

Page views

32

Article views/downloads

24

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2023.0001

Keywords

overweight
obesity
arterial hypertension
epigenetic age
accelerated ageing

Authors

Olena Kolesnikova
Olga Zaprovalna
Tetiana Bondar
Anna Potapenko

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