open access

Vol 27, No 1 (2023)
Review paper
Published online: 2023-01-31
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Methods for the assessment of microcirculation in patients with hypertension

Katarzyna Lewandowska1, Dorota Marzyńska1, Patrycja Rzesoś1, Alicja Partyka1, Franciszek Dydowicz1, Mikołaj Lewandowski1, Regina Pawlak-Chomicka1, Andrzej Tykarski1, Paweł Uruski1
·
Arterial Hypertension 2023;27(1):1-12.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Hypertensiology, Angiology and Internal Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland

open access

Vol 27, No 1 (2023)
REVIEW
Published online: 2023-01-31

Abstract

Background: Skin microcirculation is considered an easily accessible vascular bed, which can potentially be representative and helpful in evaluating, understanding the mechanisms of microvascular function and detection of its dysfunction. Many studies claim that functional changes in cutaneous circulation precede the development of arterial hypertension (HT). Identifying them at an early stage can enhance patients’ prognosis. There are methods which can be applied for these purposes. We aimed to describe available methods of skin microcirculation assessment, in the context of HT.

Material and methods: The PubMed database was searched till March 2022. Research articles used in the systematic review were experimental articles, reviews and abstracts from conference materials that reported the methods of the microcirculation assessment. From 1131 records, 47 articles were included in the final review.

Results: This review identified that the microcirculation examined with various methods was dysfunctional in HT patients. Standard HT treatment usually helped to achieve a partial reversal of those changes. Even though some of the methods described are non-invasive and relatively affordable, still, none of them is the standard for HT diagnosis.

Conclusion: Each of the methods has its advantages and disadvantages. Photoplethysmography appears to be promising. The method is non-invasive, cheap, does not require experience, and might be synchronized with mobile devices. It is possible that the simplification of the device calibration process and the development of a method allowing for the correct interpretation of the result, regardless of e.g., the patient's skin color, could influence its wider use in the group of HT patients.

Abstract

Background: Skin microcirculation is considered an easily accessible vascular bed, which can potentially be representative and helpful in evaluating, understanding the mechanisms of microvascular function and detection of its dysfunction. Many studies claim that functional changes in cutaneous circulation precede the development of arterial hypertension (HT). Identifying them at an early stage can enhance patients’ prognosis. There are methods which can be applied for these purposes. We aimed to describe available methods of skin microcirculation assessment, in the context of HT.

Material and methods: The PubMed database was searched till March 2022. Research articles used in the systematic review were experimental articles, reviews and abstracts from conference materials that reported the methods of the microcirculation assessment. From 1131 records, 47 articles were included in the final review.

Results: This review identified that the microcirculation examined with various methods was dysfunctional in HT patients. Standard HT treatment usually helped to achieve a partial reversal of those changes. Even though some of the methods described are non-invasive and relatively affordable, still, none of them is the standard for HT diagnosis.

Conclusion: Each of the methods has its advantages and disadvantages. Photoplethysmography appears to be promising. The method is non-invasive, cheap, does not require experience, and might be synchronized with mobile devices. It is possible that the simplification of the device calibration process and the development of a method allowing for the correct interpretation of the result, regardless of e.g., the patient's skin color, could influence its wider use in the group of HT patients.

Get Citation

Keywords

arterial hypertension; microcirculation; skin; microvascular rarefaction

About this article
Title

Methods for the assessment of microcirculation in patients with hypertension

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 27, No 1 (2023)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

1-12

Published online

2023-01-31

Page views

2362

Article views/downloads

489

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2023.0004

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2023;27(1):1-12.

Keywords

arterial hypertension
microcirculation
skin
microvascular rarefaction

Authors

Katarzyna Lewandowska
Dorota Marzyńska
Patrycja Rzesoś
Alicja Partyka
Franciszek Dydowicz
Mikołaj Lewandowski
Regina Pawlak-Chomicka
Andrzej Tykarski
Paweł Uruski

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