open access

Vol 26, No 4 (2022)
Original paper
Published online: 2022-11-07
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Serum uric acid level independently predicted metabolic syndrome in non-diabetic hypertensive patients

Ahmet Seyda Yılmaz1, Fatih Kahraman2, Elif Ergül1, Haldun Koç1, Mustafa Çetin1
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2022.0017
·
Arterial Hypertension 2022;26(4):146-152.
Affiliations
  1. Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, School of Medicine, Rize, Turkey
  2. Kutahya Evliya Celebi Education and Research Hospital, Turkey

open access

Vol 26, No 4 (2022)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2022-11-07

Abstract

Background: Arterial hypertension may accompany metabolic syndrome (MetS) which is strongly associated with cardiovascular diseases. Determining high-risk groups concerning MetS development is crucial to prevent this undesirable clinic. Serum uric acid level was demonstrated to be associated with development of hypertension and MetS in normal population. It was aimed to investigate the role of serum uric acid for the prediction of MetS in non-diabetic hypertensive individuals.

Material and methods: Patients who were diagnosed with arterial hypertension between January 2021 and June 2021 were included in the study. Diabetes mellitus was determined as an exclusion criteria. Metabolic syndrome was considered as the clustering of high blood pressure, elevated glucose level, abnormal cholesterol levels, and abdominal obesity conditions according to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) definition. Patients were divided into two groups by the presence of MetS.

Results: The mean age of 107 non-diabetic hypertensive patients was 48.5 ± 8.6 years and 50 (46.7%) of them were female. A total of 56 patients (52%) had MetS. Waist circumference (101.2 ± 11.3 vs. 106.7 ± 10.1 cm, p = 0.020), body mass index (30.6 ± 4.9 vs. 32.8 ± 4.1, p = 0.016), E/e’ ratio [9.2 (7.3–11.1) vs. 10.6 (9.1–13.4), p = 0.003], EAT [5.9 (4.8–8) vs. 7.9 (6–9.6), p = 0.006], and serum uric acid level (4.75 ± 1.10 vs. 5.82 ± 1.21 mg/dL, p < 0.001) were higher in MetS (+) group. Multivariable regression demonstrated that serum uric acid [(odds ratio) OR = 2.217, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.300–3.783, p = 0.003] and body mass index (OR = 1.214, 95% CI: 1.032–1.428, p = 0.019) were independent predictors of MetS presence.

Conclusion: Serum uric acid level predicted MetS presence in non-diabetic hypertensive individuals independently. This practical blood parameter can be used to evaluate those who are at risk of MetS development.

 

Abstract

Background: Arterial hypertension may accompany metabolic syndrome (MetS) which is strongly associated with cardiovascular diseases. Determining high-risk groups concerning MetS development is crucial to prevent this undesirable clinic. Serum uric acid level was demonstrated to be associated with development of hypertension and MetS in normal population. It was aimed to investigate the role of serum uric acid for the prediction of MetS in non-diabetic hypertensive individuals.

Material and methods: Patients who were diagnosed with arterial hypertension between January 2021 and June 2021 were included in the study. Diabetes mellitus was determined as an exclusion criteria. Metabolic syndrome was considered as the clustering of high blood pressure, elevated glucose level, abnormal cholesterol levels, and abdominal obesity conditions according to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) definition. Patients were divided into two groups by the presence of MetS.

Results: The mean age of 107 non-diabetic hypertensive patients was 48.5 ± 8.6 years and 50 (46.7%) of them were female. A total of 56 patients (52%) had MetS. Waist circumference (101.2 ± 11.3 vs. 106.7 ± 10.1 cm, p = 0.020), body mass index (30.6 ± 4.9 vs. 32.8 ± 4.1, p = 0.016), E/e’ ratio [9.2 (7.3–11.1) vs. 10.6 (9.1–13.4), p = 0.003], EAT [5.9 (4.8–8) vs. 7.9 (6–9.6), p = 0.006], and serum uric acid level (4.75 ± 1.10 vs. 5.82 ± 1.21 mg/dL, p < 0.001) were higher in MetS (+) group. Multivariable regression demonstrated that serum uric acid [(odds ratio) OR = 2.217, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.300–3.783, p = 0.003] and body mass index (OR = 1.214, 95% CI: 1.032–1.428, p = 0.019) were independent predictors of MetS presence.

Conclusion: Serum uric acid level predicted MetS presence in non-diabetic hypertensive individuals independently. This practical blood parameter can be used to evaluate those who are at risk of MetS development.

 

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Keywords

arterial hypertension; serum uric acid; metabolic syndrome; inflammation; insulin resistance

About this article
Title

Serum uric acid level independently predicted metabolic syndrome in non-diabetic hypertensive patients

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 26, No 4 (2022)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

146-152

Published online

2022-11-07

Page views

521

Article views/downloads

58

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2022.0017

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2022;26(4):146-152.

Keywords

arterial hypertension
serum uric acid
metabolic syndrome
inflammation
insulin resistance

Authors

Ahmet Seyda Yılmaz
Fatih Kahraman
Elif Ergül
Haldun Koç
Mustafa Çetin

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