open access

Vol 26, No 4 (2022)
Review paper
Published online: 2022-11-07
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The impact of sleep disorders in the formation of hypertension

Ganna Isayeva1, Anna Shalimova12, Olena Buriakovska1
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2022.0014
·
Arterial Hypertension 2022;26(4):170-179.
Affiliations
  1. Government Institution ‘L.T. Malaya Therapy National Institute of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine', Kharkiv, Ukraine
  2. Kharkiv National Medical University, Kharkiv, Ukraine

open access

Vol 26, No 4 (2022)
REVIEW
Published online: 2022-11-07

Abstract

Hypertension is one of the most common chronic non-communicable disease in the world. Risk factors, methods of prevention and treatment of hypertension have been sufficiently studied. However scientists are still looking for pathogenetic mechanisms of its development. At the same time 36.9% of patients with hypertension had different sleep disorders. Patients with insomnia have a 21% higher risk of developing hypertension compared with those who have quality sleep. Hypnotics are given up to 15% of patients with hypertension. Hypnotics have been shown to increase the risk of cardiovascular events. 44.1% of patients with established diseases of the cardiovascular system have problems with the quality or duration of sleep. At this time, hypertension and sleep disorders are considered mutually aggravating diseases.

Abstract

Hypertension is one of the most common chronic non-communicable disease in the world. Risk factors, methods of prevention and treatment of hypertension have been sufficiently studied. However scientists are still looking for pathogenetic mechanisms of its development. At the same time 36.9% of patients with hypertension had different sleep disorders. Patients with insomnia have a 21% higher risk of developing hypertension compared with those who have quality sleep. Hypnotics are given up to 15% of patients with hypertension. Hypnotics have been shown to increase the risk of cardiovascular events. 44.1% of patients with established diseases of the cardiovascular system have problems with the quality or duration of sleep. At this time, hypertension and sleep disorders are considered mutually aggravating diseases.

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Keywords

hypertension; sleep disorders; insomnia

About this article
Title

The impact of sleep disorders in the formation of hypertension

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 26, No 4 (2022)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

170-179

Published online

2022-11-07

Page views

523

Article views/downloads

44

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2022.0014

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2022;26(4):170-179.

Keywords

hypertension
sleep disorders
insomnia

Authors

Ganna Isayeva
Anna Shalimova
Olena Buriakovska

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