open access

Vol 25, No 1 (2021)
Original paper
Published online: 2021-03-18
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Neck circumference, visceral adiposity, and hypertension: does upper body adiposity outperforms visceral adiposity in terms of hypertension predictions?

Marziyeh Ebadi-Vanestanagh, Roghayeh Molani-Gol, Leili Faraji-Gavgani, Mohammad Alizadeh
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2021.0005
·
Arterial Hypertension 2021;25(1):22-28.

open access

Vol 25, No 1 (2021)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2021-03-18

Abstract

Background: This study set up to determine which of the neck circumference (NC), as a predictor of upper body sub-cutaneous fat, or visceral adipose tissue, as an indicator of intra-abdominal fat mass, can be the better predictor of hypertension.

Material and methods: 130 overweight/obese women took part in this cross-sectional study conducted in November 2017. Blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, and body composition were determined. Pearson’s correlation coefficients, multivariate logistic regression, and the area under the curve of the receiver operator characteristic curves analyses were performed.

Results: Mean age, weight, and neck circumference were 39.93 ± 8.71 years, 74.26 ± 9.86 Kg, and 35.06 ± 1.74 cm, respectively. There was a significant correlation between neck circumference and visceral adipose tissue with systolic blood pressure (r = 0.32, p = 0.001) (r = 0.57, p < 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.23, p = 0.008) (r = 0.45, p < 0.001), in the respective order. According to the results of the ROC curve analysis, visceral adipose tissue and neck circumference predicted hypertension with an accuracy of 81 and 65 percent, respectively. In addition, the probability of having increased blood pressure increased with higher visceral adipose tissue (OR = 1.22, p < 0.001).

Conclusions: According to our findings, abdominal obesity and high NC in implication with overweight or obesity can more exactly evaluate hypertension risk.

Abstract

Background: This study set up to determine which of the neck circumference (NC), as a predictor of upper body sub-cutaneous fat, or visceral adipose tissue, as an indicator of intra-abdominal fat mass, can be the better predictor of hypertension.

Material and methods: 130 overweight/obese women took part in this cross-sectional study conducted in November 2017. Blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, and body composition were determined. Pearson’s correlation coefficients, multivariate logistic regression, and the area under the curve of the receiver operator characteristic curves analyses were performed.

Results: Mean age, weight, and neck circumference were 39.93 ± 8.71 years, 74.26 ± 9.86 Kg, and 35.06 ± 1.74 cm, respectively. There was a significant correlation between neck circumference and visceral adipose tissue with systolic blood pressure (r = 0.32, p = 0.001) (r = 0.57, p < 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.23, p = 0.008) (r = 0.45, p < 0.001), in the respective order. According to the results of the ROC curve analysis, visceral adipose tissue and neck circumference predicted hypertension with an accuracy of 81 and 65 percent, respectively. In addition, the probability of having increased blood pressure increased with higher visceral adipose tissue (OR = 1.22, p < 0.001).

Conclusions: According to our findings, abdominal obesity and high NC in implication with overweight or obesity can more exactly evaluate hypertension risk.

Get Citation

Keywords

obesity; hypertension; neck circumference; visceral adiposity; body fat distribution

About this article
Title

Neck circumference, visceral adiposity, and hypertension: does upper body adiposity outperforms visceral adiposity in terms of hypertension predictions?

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 25, No 1 (2021)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

22-28

Published online

2021-03-18

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2021.0005

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2021;25(1):22-28.

Keywords

obesity
hypertension
neck circumference
visceral adiposity
body fat distribution

Authors

Marziyeh Ebadi-Vanestanagh
Roghayeh Molani-Gol
Leili Faraji-Gavgani
Mohammad Alizadeh

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