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Serum Amphiregulin and Cerebellin-1 Levels in Primary Hypertension Patients

Özlem Güler, Hakan Hakkoymaz, Sedat Köroğlu, Muhammed Seyithanoğlu, Hakan Güneş
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2020.0015

open access

Ahead of print
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-09-16

Abstract

Background: Hypertension is major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, stroke, congestive heart disease and renal failure. Primary hypertension is a multi-factorial complex disease and its exact etiology still remains unknown. In this study we aimed to compare serum amphiregulin and cerebellin-1 levels of primary hypertension patients with healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: Forty-four hypertensive patients and 44 healthy people were included. Patients with systolic blood pressure measurements ≥140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure measurements ≥90 mmHg were evaluated as hypertensive. Serum amphiregulin and cerebellin-1 levels were measured using ELISA method. Results: Mean amphiregulin level was 32.1 (10.2-72.5) pg/ml in hypertension group and 36.9 (15.9-109.5) pg/ml in control group. Amphiregulin level was significantly lower in hypertensive group (p=0.002). Mean cerebellin-1 levels were 82.1(23.9-286.1) pg/ml in hypertensive group and 95.1(60.2-293) pg/ml in control group. Cerebellin-1 levels were similar in hypertension and control groups (p=0.261). Serum amphiregulin to predict hypertension was found to be ≤23 pg/ml with specificity of 97% and sensitivity of 48.5% (AUC = 0.739; 95% CI, 0.619–0.859; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Serum amphiregulin level decrease in primary hypertension. Low amphiregulin (<23 pg/ml) levels are associated with primary hypertension.

Abstract

Background: Hypertension is major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, stroke, congestive heart disease and renal failure. Primary hypertension is a multi-factorial complex disease and its exact etiology still remains unknown. In this study we aimed to compare serum amphiregulin and cerebellin-1 levels of primary hypertension patients with healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: Forty-four hypertensive patients and 44 healthy people were included. Patients with systolic blood pressure measurements ≥140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure measurements ≥90 mmHg were evaluated as hypertensive. Serum amphiregulin and cerebellin-1 levels were measured using ELISA method. Results: Mean amphiregulin level was 32.1 (10.2-72.5) pg/ml in hypertension group and 36.9 (15.9-109.5) pg/ml in control group. Amphiregulin level was significantly lower in hypertensive group (p=0.002). Mean cerebellin-1 levels were 82.1(23.9-286.1) pg/ml in hypertensive group and 95.1(60.2-293) pg/ml in control group. Cerebellin-1 levels were similar in hypertension and control groups (p=0.261). Serum amphiregulin to predict hypertension was found to be ≤23 pg/ml with specificity of 97% and sensitivity of 48.5% (AUC = 0.739; 95% CI, 0.619–0.859; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Serum amphiregulin level decrease in primary hypertension. Low amphiregulin (<23 pg/ml) levels are associated with primary hypertension.

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Keywords

Amphiregulin; cerebellin-1; primary hypertension; elisa.

About this article
Title

Serum Amphiregulin and Cerebellin-1 Levels in Primary Hypertension Patients

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Ahead of print

Published online

2020-09-16

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2020.0015

Keywords

Amphiregulin
cerebellin-1
primary hypertension
elisa.

Authors

Özlem Güler
Hakan Hakkoymaz
Sedat Köroğlu
Muhammed Seyithanoğlu
Hakan Güneş

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