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Vol 23, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-01-14
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Heart rate and blood pressure is associated with renal function in patients with type 1 diabetes in the absence of nephropathy and therapeutical interventions

Tomislav Bulum, Hrvoje Premec, Lea Duvnjak
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2019.0001
·
Arterial Hypertension 2019;23(1):30-34.

open access

Vol 23, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-01-14

Abstract

Background. Albuminuria, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure are established predictors of chronic kidney disease
and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between HR, systolic blood
pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) with renal function parameters in patients with type 1 diabetes
(T1DM) without therapeutical interventions.

Material and methods. Study included 313 normoalbuminuric T1DM. HR was determined using a standard
12-lead ECG and blood pressure with a mercury sphygmomanometer, both after a resting period of 10 minutes.
Urinary albumin excretion rate (UAE) was measured from at least two 24-h urine samples. Data on serum creatinine
levels, age, sex and race were used to calculate the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the Chronic
Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) formula.

Results. eGFR was significantly associated with duration of diabetes, HbA1c, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol
(for the duration of diabetes r = –0.29, p < 0.001). UAE significantly correlated with duration of diabetes,
HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, HR and DBP (for HR and DBP r = 0.21–0.23, p < 0.001). Subjects in the 4th quartile
of UAE had significantly higher HR rate compared to subjects in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd quartiles (70 ± 11 vs. 74 ± 12
vs. 74 ± 12 vs. 79 ± 13 beats/min, p = 0.001).

Conclusions. Results of our study suggest that interplay between HR with renal function parameters is present even
in T1DM with normal renal function.

Abstract

Background. Albuminuria, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure are established predictors of chronic kidney disease
and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between HR, systolic blood
pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) with renal function parameters in patients with type 1 diabetes
(T1DM) without therapeutical interventions.

Material and methods. Study included 313 normoalbuminuric T1DM. HR was determined using a standard
12-lead ECG and blood pressure with a mercury sphygmomanometer, both after a resting period of 10 minutes.
Urinary albumin excretion rate (UAE) was measured from at least two 24-h urine samples. Data on serum creatinine
levels, age, sex and race were used to calculate the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the Chronic
Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) formula.

Results. eGFR was significantly associated with duration of diabetes, HbA1c, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol
(for the duration of diabetes r = –0.29, p < 0.001). UAE significantly correlated with duration of diabetes,
HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, HR and DBP (for HR and DBP r = 0.21–0.23, p < 0.001). Subjects in the 4th quartile
of UAE had significantly higher HR rate compared to subjects in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd quartiles (70 ± 11 vs. 74 ± 12
vs. 74 ± 12 vs. 79 ± 13 beats/min, p = 0.001).

Conclusions. Results of our study suggest that interplay between HR with renal function parameters is present even
in T1DM with normal renal function.

Get Citation

Keywords

type 1 diabetes; heart rate; renal function; albuminuria

About this article
Title

Heart rate and blood pressure is associated with renal function in patients with type 1 diabetes in the absence of nephropathy and therapeutical interventions

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 23, No 1 (2019)

Pages

30-34

Published online

2019-01-14

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2019.0001

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2019;23(1):30-34.

Keywords

type 1 diabetes
heart rate
renal function
albuminuria

Authors

Tomislav Bulum
Hrvoje Premec
Lea Duvnjak

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