open access

Vol 23, No 1 (2019)
REVIEW
Published online: 2018-10-08
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The role of aldosterone in kidney diseases and hypertension. Is it worth using mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in clinical practice?

Rafał Łukasz Donderski, Jacek Manitius
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2018.0016
·
Arterial Hypertension 2019;23(1):1-7.

open access

Vol 23, No 1 (2019)
REVIEW
Published online: 2018-10-08

Abstract

Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone which plays a pivotal role in water and electrolytes balance. Moreover,
aldosterone exerts a deleterious influence on the cardiovascular system and kidneys. In this review, we wanted to
show mechanisms of aldosterone related organ damage, the role of aldosterone in kidney diseases, hypertension and
therapeutic benefits related with aldosterone receptors blockade.

Abstract

Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone which plays a pivotal role in water and electrolytes balance. Moreover,
aldosterone exerts a deleterious influence on the cardiovascular system and kidneys. In this review, we wanted to
show mechanisms of aldosterone related organ damage, the role of aldosterone in kidney diseases, hypertension and
therapeutic benefits related with aldosterone receptors blockade.

Get Citation

Keywords

aldosterone; chronic kidney disease; hypertension; cardiovascular risk, aldosterone antagonists

About this article
Title

The role of aldosterone in kidney diseases and hypertension. Is it worth using mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in clinical practice?

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 23, No 1 (2019)

Pages

1-7

Published online

2018-10-08

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2018.0016

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2019;23(1):1-7.

Keywords

aldosterone
chronic kidney disease
hypertension
cardiovascular risk
aldosterone antagonists

Authors

Rafał Łukasz Donderski
Jacek Manitius

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